The 2012 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Investigative Reporting

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For a distinguished example of investigative reporting, using any available journalistic tool, Ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

Awarded to Michael J. Berens and Ken Armstrong of The Seattle Times for their investigation of how a little known governmental body in Washington State moved vulnerable patients from safer pain-control medication to methadone, a cheaper but more dangerous drug, coverage that prompted statewide health warnings.

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Michael J.  Berens  and Ken Armstrong


Gregory Moore (left), co-chair of The Pulitzer Prize Board, presents a 2012 Investigative Reporting Prize to Michael J. Berens (center) and Ken Armstrong (right) of The Seattle Times.

and

Awarded to Matt Apuzzo, Adam Goldman, Eileen Sullivan and Chris Hawley of the Associated Press for their spotlighting of the New York Police Department’s clandestine spying program that monitored daily life in Muslim communities, resulting in congressional calls for a federal investigation, and a debate over the proper role of domestic intelligence gathering.

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Associated Press staff


Gregory Moore (left), co-chair of The Pulitzer Prize Board, presents a 2012 Investigative Reporting Prize to (left to right) Matt Apuzzo, Adam Goldman, Chris Hawley and Eileen Sullivan of the Associated Press.

Finalists

Also nominated as a finalist in this category was: Gary Marx and David Jackson of the Chicago Tribune for their exposure of a neglectful state justice system that allowed dozens of brutal criminals to evade punishment by fleeing the country, sparking moves for corrective change.