4

Pulitzer Prize Board announces new co-chairs

Amanda Bennett, an executive editor at Bloomberg News, and David Kennedy, Stanford historian

Media Contact:
Clare Oh, clare.oh@columbia.edu or (212) 854-5479



New York, NY (April 27, 2010) — Columbia University announced today that Amanda Bennett, an executive editor for Bloomberg News noted for her leadership in investigative journalism, and David Kennedy, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, Stanford University professor and co-director of a center that studies the American West, have been elected the new co-chairs of the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Bennett and Kennedy have served on the Pulitzer Board since 2002. They replace Anders Gyllenhaal, executive editor of The Miami Herald, who recently completed his tenure as chair. Members of the Board serve a maximum of nine years while a chair serves for only one year.

Amanda Bennett

Bennett, who directs special projects and investigations for Bloomberg News, was the editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer from June, 2003, to November, 2006, and prior to that was editor of the Herald-Leader in Lexington, Kentucky. She also served for three years as managing editor/projects for The Oregonian in Portland.

Bennett served as a Wall Street Journal reporter for more than 20 years. A cum laude graduate of Harvard College, she held numerous posts at the paper, including auto industry reporter in Detroit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Pentagon and State Department reporter, Beijing correspondent, management editor/reporter, national economics correspondent and, finally, chief of the Atlanta bureau until 1998, when she moved to The Oregonian.

In 1997 Bennett shared the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting with her Journal colleagues for far-ranging coverage of the struggle against AIDS; and in 2001 she led an Oregonian team to a Pulitzer for public service, providing an “unflinching examination” of problems within the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. She is on the board of the Loeb Awards. Projects by the Bloomberg projects and investigative team won a 2008 Loeb Award, a 2009 Overseas Press Club Award, and a 2010 Polk Award.

Bennett is the author of five books including In Memoriam (1998), co-authored with Terence B. Foley; The Man Who Stayed Behind, co-authored with Sidney Rittenberg (1993), and Death of the Organization Man (1991).

She is a member of National Association of Black Journalists, and The Pennsylvania Women’s Forum. She is on the board of the American Society of News Editors, and is on the board of directors of the Temple University Press and of the Rosenbach Museum, a Philadelphia museum of rare books.

David Kennedy

Kennedy, the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History, Emeritus, and co-director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford, is a native of Seattle and a 1963 Stanford graduate. He received his Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in 1968. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1967.

Kennedy teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in 20th century United States history, American political and social thought, American foreign policy, American literature, and the comparative development of democracy in Europe and America. Graduating seniors have four times elected him as Class Day speaker. In 1988 he received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching, and in 2005 the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. He has also received the Stanford Alumni Association's Richard W. Lyman Award for faculty service. In 2008 the Yale University Graduate School presented him with its highest honor, the Wilbur Cross Medal.

Reflecting his interdisciplinary training in American studies, Kennedy's scholarship is notable for its integration of economic and cultural analysis with social and political history. His 1970 book, Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger, embraced the medical, legal, political, and religious dimensions of the subject and helped to pioneer the emerging field of women's history. Over Here: The First World War and American Society (1980) used the history of American involvement in World War I to analyze the American political system, economy and culture in the early 20th century. Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (1999) recounts the history of the American people in the two great crises of the Great Depression and World War II. Kennedy is also the co-author of a textbook in American history, The American Pageant, now in its fourteenth edition.

Birth Control in America was honored with the John Gilmary Shea Prize in 1970 and the Bancroft Prize in 1971. Over Here was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1981. Freedom From Fear won the Pulitzer and Francis Parkman Prizes in 2000, as well as the English-Speaking Union’s Ambassador’s Prize, and the Commonwealth Club of California’s California Book Award Gold Medal.

Kennedy, who has lectured on American history around the world, served as chair of the Stanford History Department; director of Stanford's Program in International Relations; and associate dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences. Among his many affiliations, he has served on the advisory board for the Public Broadcasting System's "The American Experience" and on the board of Environmental Traveling Companions, a service organization for the handicapped.

Kennedy is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as the American Philosophical Society. In 1995-96, he was the Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford University. Since 2000, he has served as editor of the Oxford History of the United States.

2010 Journalism jurors on the job

 

Arriving from across the nation, 77 jurors gathered at Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism on March 1, 2 and 3 of 2010 to judge 1,103 entries in the Journalism competition and nominate three finalists in 14 categories. Here are glimpses of the jurors at work.

 

Click on image to begin the slide show


 

Jeffrey Good, editor, Valley News, West Lebanon, N.H., reads beneath a portrait of Joseph Pulitzer, founder of the Prizes.

Photos by 2010 Photography Jurors
Nancy Andrews, Steve Gonzales and Richard Murphy.

2009 Journalism jurors in action

 

On March 2, 3 and 4, 77 jurors from across America assembled at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism to judge 1,028 entries in the Journalism competition and nominate three finalists in each of 14 categories. A snowstorm hit the night before opening day but jurors were undeterred. Here are glimpses of them on the job.

 

Click on image to begin the slide show


 

Mizell Stewart III

Photos by Photography juror Zach Ryall,
Internet managing editor, Austin American-Statesman.

Pulitzer Prizes 2008 luncheon videos

Jay Harris' remarks from the 2008 Pulitzer Prizes Luncheon (60megabytes / 19 minutes).


Richard Oppel's remarks and the presentation of the Journalism Prizes, from the 2008 Pulitzer Prizes Luncheon (70 megabytes / 28 minutes).


Richard Oppel's presentation of the Letters, Drama and Music Prizes, from the 2008 Pulitzer Prizes Luncheon (40 megabytes / 17 minutes).

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Jay Harris's 2008 luncheon remarks

Low Library, Columbia University – May 29, 2008



Jay T. Harris

Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Director, The Center for the Study
of Journalism and Democracy

Annenberg School of Communication,
University of Southern California


The transcript of Jay Harris's opening remarks from the 2008 Pulitzer Prize awards luncheon will be available soon. Please check back at a later date for the full text version. Click below for an audio clip of Harris's speech.

Jay Harris's luncheon remarks

 

Cheney's advice to Baker in 1980

The Washington Post


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Cheney's Advice to Baker in 1980

[4 pages in black handwriting on yellow legal paper. Round parentheses ( ) are Baker's; other brackets are notes added by The Washington Post. Bolded items are those of most interest.]

11/19/[80] CHENEY

1. Def & Treasury Secty's really too busy. Committee [?] them [?] and constitutencies of those depts not [?] will. [willing?] will be upset.

2. Clean House except military office -- but new top level military aides.

3. Keep Chief Clerk -- career profs. [career professionals, those two words double underlined]

4. Keep all career profs. (about 1/2 of the employees)

5. Get rid of Eleanor Conner [?]

6. Keep Connie [?] Gerard & Nell Yates.

7. Darman -- good staff secty - familiarity w/ gov't. (Staffing loops are on a piece of paper showing who sees paper before it goes in.)

[in margin with arrow from this point:] Give office space decisions to him. (Parking, tennis court, drivers.)

8. Can split Cab Secty & Staff Secty

9. C of S. Make all the trips w/ Pres.

10. Gen'l [?] Deputy to man the shop when gone (Gergen? Hodsoll[?]?)

[in margin:] Deaver will have Depty title

11. Maybe - Gergan as ass't to Pres for Comms.

----

[now there's a line, numbering system stops and restarts]

Pres. seriously weakened in recent yrs.

1. Restore power & auth to Exec Branch - Need strong ldr'ship. Get rid of War Powers Act - restore independent rights.

[in margin:] ****** Central theme we ought to push

[page break]

2. Strong Cab & strong staff in WH. Not "either or" proposition. Have to have both

3. Orderly schedule & orderly paper flow is way you protect the Pres.

Well designed system. Got to be brutal in scheduling decisions.

Most valuable asset in DC is time of RR

Need to have discipline & order & be discriminating

4. Stay away from "oh by the way" decisions -- [illegible text]

----------[wavy line]

Take a walking tour when see [?] Watson[?]

--- [line]

It's not in anyone's interest to get an "oh by the way decision" - & all have to understand that. Can hurt the Pres. Bring it up at a Cab. mtg. Make sure everyone understands this.

---[line]

Requests from Cab members to see Pres. have to

[page break follows, but thought not finished, seems to be saying have to let cabinet members in if they ask]

[in red pen under this, just before page break:] give 24 hrs turnaround time.

[page break]

BE AN HONEST BROKER

DON'T USE THE PROCESS TO IMPOSE YOUR POLICY VIEWS ON PRES.

[on two points above, JAB has put four vertical red stars in margin, as if he reviewed this later]

---- [line]

Keep a low profile.

Talk to press - always on background.

You've got good credibility w/ press. Husband it carefully.

View document: Baker's notes from his 1980 meeting with Cheney (PDF). (Click on image to enlarge)

If you become a major public figure - quoted all time in paper - you lose credibility - feathering own nest rather than serving Pres. Also no way to be public re issues w/out appearing to take sides.

Do a Meet Press occasionally - try and limit to process & procedures and not issues. [in margin, in red:] style

~~~~~~~

8 or 9 senior people can have portal to portal transp.

~~~~

Have full field FBI investigations run on all W.H. staff. This gives "Top Secret" clearance. You should

[in margin:] Counsel's office do it

[in margin, two stars] **

[page break]

decide who should receive clearance over & above Top Secret.

C of S should see Pres's daily brief from CIA.

~~~~

Code of Ethics under Ford will be a good one to use. Aftermath of Watergate. Let Counsel's office work on it. Publish them. Conflict of Ints - blind Trusts,
etc.

~~~~

Press Secty: Doesn't have to be a reporter or journalist. Better off if not. What press really wants is someone who: (1) speaks for Pres (2) they can trust what he says. (Not a press guy in Oval Office but a Pres's guy in press room.)

[in margin:] ***** [5stars and then:] Deaver would be perfect! Need someone close to Pres. Need Pres's man out front.

----

[crossed out:] Ed Schia [Schw?] [looks like name may be unfinished]

SOURCE: The James A. Baker III Papers, Seeley G. Mudd Library, Princeton University.



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2007 The Washington Post Company

Past Prize Winners

There are no award categories by that name.

Search Help

The Pulitzer Search feature allows you to enter any set of terms, or an exact phrase to be found. It also allows you to find pages that do not include a particular phrase or set of words.

2007 Prizes Luncheon Slideshow

Click on the thumbnail to see the slideshow from the 2007 Prizes luncheon (42 photos).

Luncheon 5

Pulitzer Board widens range of online journalism in entries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contacts:
Sig Gissler, 212-854-3841 or sg138@columbia.edu
Melanie A. Farmer, 212-854-9082 or mf2362@columbia.edu

New York, Nov. 27, 2006 — The Pulitzer Prize Board announced today that newspapers may now submit a full array of online material-such as databases, interactive graphics, and streaming video-in nearly all of its journalism categories.

The board also announced that a category called Local Reporting will replace Beat Reporting as one of the 14 prizes in journalism.

All changes will apply to work done in 2006 for prizes awarded in 2007. The Pulitzer Prizes each year are administered at Columbia University.

Last year, the board for the first time allowed some online content in all categories. However, with the exception of the Public Service category, the online work was limited to written stories or still images.

Now, an assortment of online elements will be permitted in all journalism categories except for the competition's two photography categories, which will continue to restrict entries to still images. The Pulitzer categories range from investigative and international reporting to commentary, editorial writing, and cartooning.

"This board believes that its much fuller embrace of online journalism reflects the direction of newspapers in a rapidly changing media world," said Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes.

In two categories, Breaking News Reporting and Breaking News Photography, the board will continue to allow an entry consisting entirely of material published on a newspaper's Web site. In all other categories, an entry may contain online material, but it must also contain material published in the newspaper's print edition.

The definition of the new Local Reporting category states: "for a distinguished example of local reporting that illuminates significant issues or concerns."

The purpose of the new category is to encourage and honor exemplary local journalism, marked by strong reporting across a spectrum of potential subjects. "The Pulitzer Prizes have long valued such reporting," Gissler said, "but this makes our interest much more explicit."

While the local category replaces the Beat Reporting category that was created in 1991, the work of beat reporters remains eligible for entry in a wide range of categories that include-depending on the specialty involved-national, investigative, and explanatory reporting, as well as the new local category.

With its new rules for online submissions, the Pulitzer Board will require each online element to be a single, discretely designated presentation, such as a database, blog, interactive graphic, slide show, or video presentation. Each designated element will count as one item in the total number of items, print or online, that are permitted in an entry.

"In effect, a newspaper must call out which online element it wants to be considered," Gissler said. "If an element has multiple parts, such as a graphic with various entry points, the conceptual logic linking the parts must be clear."

In any category, according to the rules, online material must be published on the newspaper's Web site and, when submitted for competition, "must depict its original publication on the Web, not its subsequent update or alteration."

The revised rules, entry forms, and guidelines on the submission of entries can be found on the Pulitzer Prize Web site (www.pulitzer.org). The deadline for entries is Feb. 1, 2007.

About Columbia University

Founded in 1754 as King's College, Columbia University in the City of New York is the fifth oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and today is one of the world's leading academic and research institutions. For more information about Columbia University, visit www.columbia.edu.

Pulitzer Prize Board honors jazz legend John Coltrane with special citation

Columbia University
Office of Public Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:
Media Contact: Robert Hornsby, 212-854-9752 or email rh2239@columbia.edu

New York, April 17, 2007 — The Pulitzer Prize Board has awarded a posthumous Special Citation to legendary jazz composer John Coltrane for his lifetime of innovated and influential work.

The citation lauds Coltrane for “his masterful improvisation, supreme musicianship and iconic centrality to the history of jazz.”

The Board announced the award Monday afternoon.

“First and foremost, this citation aims to honor a composer and artist who had an indelible impact on music in America and across the world,” said Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes. “It also underscores the Board’s continuing desire to broaden its Music Prize to recognize the full range of musical excellence in America that might not have been considered under previous rules and practices.”

The Board voted in 2004 to widen the definition of the Music Prize. Last year, a posthumous Special Citation was awarded to composer Thelonoius Monk, another jazz great.

The Board’s Music Committee, chaired by Jim Amoss, editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, proposed the citation for Coltrane after a confidential survey of a range of experts in the music field.

The committee said of Coltrane:
“His exalted stature arises from his composition and recordings. In ‘A Love Supreme,’ he produced an imposing composition expressing faith. In ‘Africa/Brass Selections,’ he achieved astonishing orchestral feats. His work has weight, an artistic quest and searching nature. Coltrane infused the existing tradition with innovation and radical approaches. The surface of his music is dynamic and palpable, the underlying structure is suffused with spirituality and provocative political content.”

About the Pulitzer Prizes:

The Pulitzer Prize Board announced the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Winners and Nominated Finalists on April 16, 2007. For the complete list of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Award Winners, please visit, www.pulitzer.org.

For more information about the Pulitzer Prize Awards, please contact:
Sig Gissler, administrator, Pulitzer Prizes, 212-854-7327 or email sg138@columbia.edu
Jim Amoss, chair of Music Committee, Pulitzer Prize Board, 524-826-3475 or email jamoss@timespicayune.com

About Columbia University

Founded in 1754 as King's College, Columbia University in the City of New York is the fifth oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and today is one of the world's leading academic and research institutions.

Veteran newspaper editors Joann Byrd and Mike Pride named new co-chairs of the Pulitzer Prize Board

Columbia University
Office of Public Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:
Sig Gissler, (212) 854-3841 or sg138@columbia.edu
Melanie A. Farmer, 212-854-9082 or mf2362@columbia.edu

New York, April 26, 2007 — Columbia University today announced that Joann Byrd, most recently editorial page editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and Mike Pride, editor of the Concord Monitor, have been appointed the new co-chairs of the Pulitzer Prize Board. Byrd will chair the fall Pulitzer board meeting and Pride the spring meeting. Both have been board members since 1999 and replace Paul E. Steiger, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal and vice president at Dow Jones & Co., who served on the Pulitzer Board since 1998. Members of the board serve a maximum of nine years.

Byrd, a newspaper editor for 47 years, is currently writing a book about the Heppner, Oregon, flood of 1903. Prior to her retirement in June 2003 from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Byrd was ombudsman at The Washington Post and had been executive editor of the Herald in Everett, Washingon, for 12 years. She was a reporter and assistant city editor at the Spokane Daily Chronicle before joining the Herald. Byrd won the 2003 Society of Professor Journalists June Anderson Almquist Award for Distinguished Service to Journalism and was inducted into the University of Oregon Hall of Achievement in 2000.

Mike Pride has been editor of the Concord Monitor since 1983 and previously served as its managing editor. Under his guidance, the Monitor has garnered numerous national awards including the New England Newspaper of the Year Award, which it received 19 times.

Before joining the Monitor, Pride served in the U.S. Army in the 1960s and was city editor of the Clearwater Sun and the Tallahassee Democrat. Pride, a former Nieman Fellow at Harvard, won the National Press Foundation's Editor of the Year Award in 1987 for directing the Monitor's coverage of the Challenger disaster and later won the Yankee Quill Award for contributions to New England journalism. He is the co-author of My Brave Boys, a Civil War history, and Too Dead to Die, the memoir of a Bataan Death March survivor. Pride taught a presidential politics course at Gettysburg College and has also been a lecturer and tour guide at the College's Civil War Institute.

The 2007 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on April 16. An awards ceremony honoring this year's winners will take place on May 21 at Columbia University, which administers the annual awards.

About Columbia University

A leading academic and research university, Columbia continually seeks to advance the frontiers of knowledge and to foster a campus community deeply engaged in understanding and addressing the complex issues of our time. Columbia's extensive cultural collaborations and community partnerships help define the University's underlying values and mission to educate students to be both leading scholars and informed, engaged citizens. Founded in 1754 as King's College, Columbia University in the City of New York is the fifth oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. www.columbia.edu.

Paul Gigot press release

Columbia University
Office of Public Affairs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:
Sig Gissler, (212) 854-3841 or sg138@columbia.edu
Clare Oh, (212) 854-5479 or clare.oh@columbia.edu


Paul Gigot,The Wall Street Journal
editorial page editor, joins Pulitzer Prize Board


New York, Dec. 6, 2007 — Columbia University today announced that Paul Gigot, the editorial page editor and vice president of The Wall Street Journal, has been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

With nearly 30 years of service with The Wall Street Journal, Gigot has been the paper's editorial page editor and vice president since September 2001. He is responsible for the newspaper's editorials, op-ed articles and Leisure & Arts criticism and directs the editorial pages of the Journal's Asian and European editions and the OpinionJournal.com Web site. He is also the host of the weekly half-hour news program, the Journal Editorial Report, on the Fox News Channel.

Gigot joined the Journal in 1980 as a reporter in Chicago, and in 1982 he became the Journal's Asia correspondent, based in Hong Kong. He won an Overseas Press Club award for his reporting on the Philippines. In 1984, he was named the first editorial page editor of The Asian Wall Street Journal, based in Hong Kong. In 1987, he was assigned to Washington, where he contributed editorials and a weekly column on politics, "Potomac Watch," which won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

Gigot is a summa cum laude graduate of Dartmouth College, where he was chairman of the daily student newspaper.

The 91st annual Pulitzer Prizes will be announced on April 7, 2008, and presented in May at a ceremony at Columbia. The Pulitzer Prizes are awarded annually for excellence in journalism, literature, music and drama in 21 categories.

About the Prizes

The Pulitzer Prizes, which are administered at Columbia University, were established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and newspaper publisher, who left money to Columbia University upon his death in 1911. A portion of his bequest was used to found the School of Journalism in 1912 and establish the Pulitzer Prizes, which were first awarded in 1917.

The 19-member board is composed mainly of leading editors or news executives from media outlets across the U.S., as well as four academics. The dean of Columbia's journalism school and the administrator of the prizes are nonvoting members. The chair rotates annually to the most senior member. The board is self-perpetuating in the election of members. Voting members may serve three terms of three years for a total of nine years.

In the news

Pulitzer Prize winners in the news

U alumnus
wins Pulitzer

-- by Anne Millerbernd
and Meghan Holden
(mndaily.com/April 15, 2015)



Pulitzer winner
dug beyond politics
to explore impact of
food stamps on
American families

-- interview by Gwen Ifill/PBS Newshour
(netnebraska.com/April 15, 2014)

Pulitzer-winning play
'The Flick' to
reopen in New York

-- by Patrick Healy
(nytimes.com/April 14, 2014)



Megan Marshall
wins Pulitzer Prize

-- by Dan O'Brien
(emerson.edu/April 14, 2014)




Author of 'Toms River'
wins Pulitzer

-- by Russ Zimmer
(app.com/April 14, 2014)




A Q&A with
Pulitzer Prize-Winning poet
Vijay Seshadri

-- by Annalisa Quinn
(npr.org/April 15, 2014)



Composer John Luther Adams,
former longtime Alaskan,
wins Pulitzer Prize

-- by Mike Dunham
(adn.com/April 14, 2014)



Donna Tartt
'surprised' by
Pulitzer for 'Goldfinch'

-- by Bob Minzesheimer
(usatoday.com/April 15, 2014)



Washington Post wins
Pulitzer Prize for
NSA spying revelations;
Guardian also honored

-- by Paul Farhi
(washingtonpost.com/April 14, 2014)


The Oregonian wins
for editorial writing;
finalist for
explanatory reporting

-- by Yuxing Zheng
(oregonlive.com/April 14, 2014)


California professor
repeats history
with Pulitzer

-- by Associated Press
(washingtonpost.com/April 14, 2014)



Observer cartoonist
Kevin Siers
wins Pulitzer Prize

-- by Mark Washburn
(charlotteobserver.com/April 14, 2014)



Free Press' Stephen Henderson
wins 2014 Pulitzer Prize
for commentary

-- by JC Reindl
(freep.com/April 14, 2014)



Inquirer's Inga Saffron
wins Pulitzer

-- by Robert Moran
(philly.com/April 15, 2014)




Globe wins Pulitzer
for breaking news coverage
of Boston Marathon bombings

-- by Martin Finucane
(bostonglobe.com/April 14, 2014)



Center wins first
Pulitzer Prize

(publicintegrity.org/April 14, 2014)





Tampa Bay Times
wins Pulitzer for
Hillsborough Homeless
Recovery investigation

-- by Peter Jamison
(tampabay.com/April 14, 2014)




Images of
heart-wrenching pain
part of Pulitzer exhibit

-- by Patrick Farrell
(miamiherald.com/February 15, 2014)



Alice Walker
thinking about
her legacy

-- by Hillel Italie/AP
(rep-am.com/February 11, 2014)



Pulitzer-Prize winning
photojournalist Carol Guzy
reflects on her
illustrious career

-- by Rehman Tungekar and Jim Flink
(kbia.org/January 16, 2014)



Past winners & finalists by category

To view a list of all winners and finalists in a given category select category below. Finalists have been announced since 1980.

Letters, Drama, and Music

Biography or Autobiography
1917-present
Drama
1917-present
Fiction
1948-present
General Nonfiction
1962-present
History
1917-present
Music
1943-present
Novel
1917-1947
Poetry
1922-present

Special Awards and Citations

Special Awards and Citations
1917-present

The Medal

PULITZER GOLD

The Pulitzer Prize Medal The iconic Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal is awarded each year to the American new organization that wins the Public Service category. It is never awarded to an individual. However, through the years, the Medal has come to symbolize the entire Pulitzer program.

In 1918, a year after the Prizes began, the medal was designed by sculptor Daniel Chester French and his associate Henry Augustus Lukeman. French later gained fame for his seated Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. One side of the medal displays the profile of Benjamin Franklin, apparently based on the bust by French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon. Decorating the other side is a husky, bare-chested printer at work, his shirt draped across the end of a press. Surrounding the printer are the words: "For disinterested and meritorious public service rendered by an American newspaper during the year…."

The name of the winning news organization is inscribed on the Franklin side of the medal. The year of the award is memorialized on the other side.

The medal, about two and three-quarter inches in diameter and a quarter-inch thick, is not solid gold. It is silver with 24-carat gold plate and presented to the winning newspaper in an elegant cherry-wood box with brass hardware.

Press releases

Press releases, 2014

Press releases for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler to retire
—January 15, 2014

Press releases, 2013

Call for wider range of Editorial Writing entries
—September 17, 2013

Paul Tash, CEO of Tampa Bay Times, elected chair of Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 15, 2013

John Daniszewski, AP news executive, joins Pulitzer Board
—May 1, 2013

Jurors search for nation’s best journalism (slide show)
—May 2013

Press releases for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press releases, 2012

Journalist, playwright and regional newspaper editor named to Pulitzer Prize Board
—October 23, 2012

2012 Journalism Jurors leap to online judging system (slide show)
—May 2012

Gregory Moore and Thomas Friedman elected co-chairs of Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 10, 2012

Stephen Engelberg, managing editor of ProPublica, named to Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 3, 2012

Press releases for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press releases, 2011

Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism move to all-digital entry system
—November 30, 2011

Steven Hahn, American historian, and Robert Blau, an editor at Bloomberg News, join Pulitzer Board
—October 26, 2011

Margaret Sullivan, editor of Buffalo News, joins Pulitzer Prize Board
—June 21, 2011

Three journalism leaders elected to head Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 12, 2011

2011 Journalism jurors at work (slide show)
—April 2011

Press releases for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press releases, 2010

Pulitzer Prize Board announces changes for 2011 journalism competition
—December 8, 2010

Eugene Robinson, Washington Post columnist, joins Pulitzer Prize Board
—December 2, 2010

Novelist Junot Díaz joins Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 20, 2010

Pulitzer Prize Board announces new co-chairs:Amanda Bennett, an Executive Editor at Bloomberg News, and David Kennedy, Stanford Historian
—April 27, 2010

2010 Journalism jurors on the job (slide show)
—March 2010

Press releases for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press releases, 2009

Pulitzer Prize Board elects new member, Jim VandeHei, co-founder of Politico
—December 7, 2009

The Pulitzer Prize Board eases eligibility for online-only entries
—December 2, 2009

Columbia University announces Anders Gyllenhaal, executive editor of The Miami Herald, as new chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board
—May 6, 2009

2009 Journalism jurors in action (slide show)
—March 2009

Press releases for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press Releases, 2008

Pulitzer Prizes broadened to include online-only publications primarily devoted to original news reporting
—December 8, 2008

Pulitzer Prize Board elects two new Board members: Randell Beck, South Dakota publisher, and Keven Willey, Texas editorial page editor
—December 3, 2008

Joyce Dehli joins Pulitzer Prize Board —May 1, 2008

Jay Harris and Richard Oppel are new co-chairs of Pulitzer Prize Board —April 25, 2008

Press releases for the 2008 Pulitzer Prize announcements


Press releases, 2007

Paul Gigot joins Pulitzer Prize Board —Dec. 6, 2007

Veteran newspaper editors Joann Byrd and Mike Pride named new co-chairs of the Pulitzer Prize Board —April 26, 2007

Pulitzer Prize Board honors John Coltrane with special citation —April 17, 2007


Press releases, 2006

—Pulitzer Prizes recognize previously anonymous photo winner —Dec. 6, 2006

Iranian photographer Jahangir Razmi to receive award for his iconic 1979 firing squad photo...

Pulitzer Board widens range of online journalism in entries —Nov. 27, 2006


Press Releases, 2004

Statement on changes to the music prize (pdf) —June 1, 2004.


Press releases, 2003

Statement on Walter Duranty's 1932 Prize —Nov. 21, 2003

—After more than six months of study and deliberation, the Pulitzer Prize Board has decided it will not revoke the foreign reporting prize awarded in 1932 to Walter Duranty of The New York Times...

Pulitzer Prize luncheon


Low Library
Columbia University
New York City

Pulitzer Prizes are awarded at a luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in May, usually a full month after the winners have been announced. The annual luncheons began in 1984. Prior to that time Pulitzer Prize certificates, medals and checks were sent in the mail.
—photo credit: Eileen Barroso



     2013

View the 2013 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show—photos by Eileen Barroso and Jake Young

Remarks (text), May 30, 2013 Paul Tash, Chairman and CEO, Tampa Bay Times; Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Winners group photo, May 31, 2013 —Group photo of 2013 Pulitzer Prize winners

Luncheon video of remarks by Paul Tash and presentation of the Prizes


     2012

Luncheon 5

View the 2012 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show —photos by Eileen Barroso and Jake Young

Remarks (text), May 21, 2012 Gregory Moore (right), Editor, The Denver Post; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Remarks (text), May 21, 2012 Thomas Friedman (left), Columnist, The New York Times; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board.

Luncheon video of remarks by Gregory Moore, Thomas Friedman and presentation of the Prizes

Winners group photo, May 21, 2012 —Group photo of 2012 Pulitzer Prize winners


     2011

Luncheon 5

View the 2011 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show —photos by Eileen Barroso and Jake Young

Remarks (text), May 23, 2011 Kathleen Carroll, Executive Editor and Senior Vice President, the Associated Press; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Remarks (text), May 23, 2011 Ann Marie Lipinski, Curator-designate, Nieman Foundation; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Luncheon video of remarks by Kathleen Carroll, Ann Marie Lipinski, Lee C. Bollinger and presentation of the Prizes

Winners group photo, May 23, 2011 —Group photo of 2011 Pulitzer Prize winners


     2010

Luncheon 5

View the 2010 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show —photos by Eileen Barroso

Remarks (text), May 24, 2010 David M. Kennedy, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History Emeritus, Stanford University; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Remarks (text), May 24, 2010 Amanda Bennett, Executive Editor/Projects and Investigations, Bloomberg News; Co-chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Luncheon video of remarks by David M. Kennedy, Amanda Bennett, Lee C. Bollinger and presentation of the Prizes

Winners group photo, May 24, 2010 —Group photo of 2010 Pulitzer Prize Winners


     2009

Luncheon 5

View the 2009 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show —photos by Eileen Barroso

Remarks (text), May 28, 2009 Anders Gyllenhaal, Executive Editor, The Miami Herald; Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Luncheon video of remarks by Anders Gyllenhaal, Lee C. Bollinger and presentation of the Prizes

Winners group photo, May 28, 2009 —Group photo of 2009 Pulitzer Prize Winners


     2008

Luncheon 5

View the 2008 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show —photos by Eileen Barroso

Remarks, May 29, 2008 (video)Jay T. Harris— Director, The Center for the Study of Journalism and Democracy, Annenberg School of Communication, University of Southern California; Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Winners group photo, May 29, 2008 —Group photo of 2008 Pulitzer Prize Winners

How the Pulitzer Prizes are chosen:—For Pulitzer board members, the hope is that winning a prize will be a beginning, not a final wreath on a winner's head. Column in the American Statesman by Richard Oppel, Pulitzer Prize Board Co-chair. (June 08)


     2007

Luncheon 5

View the 2007 Pulitzer Prize luncheon slide show

Remarks, May 21, 2007Mike Pride— Editor, Concord (NH) Monitor; Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Remarks, May 21, 2007Joann Byrd— Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board, Special Presentation to Jahangir Razmi

Winners group photo, May 21, 2007 —Group photo of 2007 Pulitzer Prize Winners


     2006

Remarks, May 22, 2006Paul Steiger—Managing Editor, The Wall Street Journal; Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Winners group photo, May 22, 2006 —Group photo of 2006 Pulitzer Prize Winners


     2005

Remarks, May 23, 2005: "A Republic of Letters" —Henry Louis Gates Jr.— W.E.B. DuBois Professor of Humanities, Harvard University; Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Winners group photo, May 23, 2005 —Group photo of 2005 Pulitzer Prize Winners


     2004

Remarks, May 24, 2004Andrew Barnes—Chairman, Poynter Institute for Media Studies; Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board


     2003

Remarks, May 29, 2003Rena Pederson—Editor at Large, The Dallas Morning News; Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board

Remarks, May 29, 2003William Safire—Columnist, The New York Times; Co-Chair, The Pulitzer Prize Board


     2002

Remarks, May 30, 2002John Caroll—Editor and Executive V.P. Los Angeles Times