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2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Feature Photography

Liz O. Baylen, Los Angeles Times, for her intimate essay, shot in shadowy black and white, documenting the shattered lives of people entangled in prescription drug abuse.

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Liz O. Baylen joined the Los Angeles Times as a staff photographer in 2007.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Breaking News Photography

Denver Post Staff for its skillful coverage of the mass shooting at a theater in Aurora, Colo., capturing the scope of the tragedy in a poignant portfolio of pictures.

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2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Breaking News Photography

Tyler Hicks, The New York Times, for his powerful pictures chronicling deadly destruction in Gaza following a retaliatory bombing by Israel.

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Tyler Hicks is a staff photographer for The New York Times.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Editorial Cartooning

Jeff Darcy, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, OH, for his fresh portfolio of cartoons that feature deft caricatures and leave no one guessing where he stands on important issues.

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Jeff Darcy joined The Plain Dealer in 1993 as a cartoonist and illustrator for the Opinion pages.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Editorial Cartooning

Clay Bennett, the Chattanooga Times Free Press, for polished, witty cartoons that effectively lampoon prominent leaders and groups in a polarized America.

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Clay Bennett joined the staff of the Chattanooga Times Free Press in 2008.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Investigative Reporting

Alexandra Zayas, Tampa Bay Times, for her probe into unlicensed religious group-homes where children were beaten and locked in closet-size rooms for violating senseless rules, prompting action by state authorities

 

-all links are to pdfs-

October 28, 2012 In God's name
October 28, 2012 Homes operating without state oversite
October 28, 2012 On the brink of death
October 29, 2012 Bruised, but still standing
October 29, 2012 Foster kids sent to unlicensed homes
October 30, 2012 Locked away from sin
October 30, 2012 A different, gentler approach
November 1, 2012 State reviews unlicensed homes
December 2, 2012 Closed church school again accepting boys
Cover letter for entry

 

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Alexandra Zayas is a general assignment reporter based in Tampa. A native Floridian, Zayas joined the Times in 2005.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Investigative Reporting

Patricia Callahan, Sam Roe and Michael Hawthorne, Chicago Tribune, for their exposure of manufacturers that imperil public health by continuing to use toxic fire retardants in household furniture and crib mattresses, triggering reform efforts at the state and national level.

 

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May 6, 2012 Playing with fire
May 8, 2012 Big Tobacco’s clout
May 8, 2012 Big Tobacco’s playbook
May 9, 2012 'Flat-out deceptive'
May 10, 2012 Toxic roulette
December 28, 2012 Chemicals in the crib
December 30, 2012 Flawed research props up industry
June 19, 2012 Flame retardants targeted
July 18, 2012 EPA targets flame retardants
July 25, 2012 Chemical firms grilled about flame retardants
Cover letter for entry

 

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Patricia Callahan, a Chicago Tribune investigative reporter since 2004, has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes.

Sam Roe has been a Chicago Tribune investigative reporter since 2000.

Michael Hawthorne is an award-winning investigative reporter who writes about the environment for the Chicago Tribune.

 

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

National Reporting

Craig Whitlock, Greg Miller, Karen DeYoung and Julie Tate, The Washington Post, for their fresh exploration of how American drones moved from a temporary means to kill terrorists to a permanent weapon of war, raising issues of legality and accountability.

 

-all links are to pdfs unless otherwise indicated-

October 24, 2012 Behind the U.S. targeted killing program (Video)
October 24, 2012 U.S. set to keep kill lists for years
October 25, 2012 Patients' 2d peril
October 26, 2012 Secret ops grow at U.S. base
December 2, 2012 Military to boost its spy corps
ongoing Tracking America's drone war (Interactive database)
June 15, 2012 U.S. outsources bulk of Africa spy work
June 14, 2012 Military expands spying in Africa
Cover letter for entry

 

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Craig Whitlock has been a staff writer for The Washington Post since 1998.

Greg Miller has covered U.S. intelligence agencies and national security for The Washington Post since joining the paper in March 2010.

Karen DeYoung is Senior National Security Correspondent and Associate Editor of The Washington Post.

Julie Tate has worked as a researcher for The Washington Post since 2002.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

National Reporting

Liz Kowalczyk, Carolyn Johnson, Todd Wallack, Patricia Wen and Kay Lazar, The Boston Globe, for their aggressive coverage of the deadly national outbreak of fungal meningitis traced to a compounding pharmacy in suburban Boston, revealing how the medical regulatory system failed to safeguard patients.

 

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October 28, 2012 A deadly puzzle, and then a breakthrough
December 9, 2012 Little scrutiny as drug compounder expanded
December 21, 2012 Patients' 2d peril
October 18, 2012 Success story gone afoul
October 31, 2012 Despite bacteria, a clean report
October 6, 2012 Pharmacy oversight questioned
November 14, 2012 State was lax on drug maker
November 21, 2012 Pharmacy case may see call for jail time
December 30, 2012 A wish for relief, a tainted drug, a tragic outcome
Cover letter for entry

 

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Liz Kowalczyk has covered medicine and health care for the Boston Globe for twelve years.

Carolyn Johnson has been the Boston Globe's science reporter since 2008.

Todd Wallack has worked as a business reporter for the Boston Globe since 2007.

Patricia Wen is a staff writer for the Boston Globe focusing on health/science and social service issues.

Kay Lazar is a health/science reporter at The Boston Globe who specializes in public health, aging and sports medicine.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Local Reporting

Ames Alexander and Karen Garloch of The Charlotte (N.C.) Observer and Joseph Neff and David Raynor of The News and Observer, Raleigh, N.C., for their tenacious joint project investigating how the state’s major nonprofit hospitals generate large profits and contribute to the high cost of health care.

 

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April 22, 2012 Nonprofit hospitals thrive on profits
April 22, 2012 CHS evolution: public hospital, private attitude
April 22, 2012 Million-dollar execs
April 23, 2012 Most N.C. hospitals slim on charity care
April 24, 2012 Hospital suits force new pain on patients
April 25, 2012 Hospitals' clout in capital built with money, contacts
September 23, 2012 Prices soar as hospitals dominate cancer market
September 30, 2012 Hospitals probed on use of drug discounts
October 7, 2012 AG wants to reduce hospital prices
December 16, 2012 As doctors flock to hospitals, bills spike
Cover letter for entry

 

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Ames Alexander is an investigative reporter for The Charlotte Observer. Alexander has written for the Observer since 1993.

Karen Garloch is The Charlotte Observer’s medical writer. She has written about hospitals and health care in North Carolina since 1987.

Joseph Neff is an investigative reporter at The News & Observer. He has written extensively about criminal justice.

David Raynor is news research database editor for The News & Observer. Raynor works with reporters in acquiring, maintaining and analyzing data.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Local Reporting

David Breen, Stephen Hudak, Jeff Kunerth and Denise-Marie Ordway, Orlando (FL) Sentinel, for their aggressive coverage of hazing rituals by the Florida A&M University marching band that killed a drum major and led to the resignation of the band leader and the university president.

 

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January 8, 2012 For years, FAMU parents warned officials of hazing
February 5, 2012 Brutal hazing rituals defied ban, band members say
February 18, 2012 Records point to more FAMU hazing
May 10, 2012 2 charged in FAMU hazing not enrolled
May 11, 2012 FAMU band director will leave
May 24, 2012 'I saw death'
July 1, 2012 Concern over academics at FAMU grows
July 7, 2012 Dean had urged band be suspended
July 12, 2012 President resigns amid FAMU scandal
October 6, 2012 Band grades raise concern
Cover letter for entry

 

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David Breen is a communities reporter for the Orlando Sentinel, covering Osceola County and municipalities in north Orange County.

Stephen Hudak is a communities reporter for the Orlando Sentinel, covering west Orange County.

Jeff Kunerth covers demographics, minority affairs and religion for the Orlando Sentinel.

Denise-Marie Ordway (formerly Denise-Marie Balona) covers higher education for the Orlando Sentinel.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Breaking News Reporting

Staff of The Hartford Courant for its complete and sensitive coverage of the shooting massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., that killed 20 children and 6 adults, using digital tools as well as traditional reporting to tell the story quickly while portraying the stunned community’s grief.

 

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December 14, 2012 Tragedy in Newtown
December 14, 2012 Images of the day
December 14, 2012 Social media: The day of the shooting
December 15, 2012 A gunman bent on carnage
December 15, 2012 A beloved principal
December 16, 2012 Gunman went room to room in a methodical massacre
December 16, 2012 Profile emerges, but motive still elusive
December 17, 2012 The victims
December 17, 2012 Sending them out the door will never feel the same
December 17, 2012 A small town struggles to find its equilibrium
Cover letter for entry

 

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The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Breaking News Reporting

Staff of The Denver Post for its vivid coverage of a wildfire that destroyed more than 300 homes, combining on-the-ground reporting with imaginative use of digital tools, including a before-and-after interactive feature that helped displaced fire victims determine the fate of their homes before there was official notification.

 

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June 26, 2012 State of alarm
June 26, 2012 Twitter #WaldoCanyonFire
June 26, 2012 Photos: Eyewitnesses to destruction
June 28, 2012 Hills of sorrow
June, 2012 Before and after views of neighborhood
June 27, 2012 "It’s in our neighborhood"
June, 2012 Mapping the damage
June 29, 2012 "Heartbreaking"
June 30, 2012 "They were very quiet. There isn’t much left of their house."
July 6, 2012 "This is the same place we had fire last night."
Cover letter for entry

 

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The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

International Reporting

Richard Marosi, the Los Angeles Times, for his provocative articles on the fate of thousands of illegal Mexican immigrants deported by the United States in recent years, many who are living desperate lives along the U.S.-Mexico border.

 

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January 8, 2012 Desparate for his past life
May 27, 2012 A haven for broken lives
September 9, 2012 A hostile homecoming
October 21, 2012 A migration in reverse
December 2, 2012 Battling for his daughters
December 27, 2012 A risky return to the U.S.
Cover letter for entry

 

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Richard Marosi has been San Diego bureau border reporter at the Los Angeles Times since 2004.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

International Reporting

Staff of the Associated Press for its brave portrayal of the chaotic civil war in Syria, using text stories as well as multimedia tools to provide on-the-ground accounts as well as wider context, often at personal peril to the journalists.

 

-all links are to pdfs unless otherwise indicated-

June 21, 2012 AP Impact: Syria rebels divided, at times violent
June 23, 2012 Syrian civilians hit hard by spreading violence
Images from Idlib
August 11, 2012 Rebels carve out large enclave in north Syria
August 23, 2012 AP IMPACT: With war, Syrians in constant flight
September 21, 2012 Struggle and survival in Syria (Video)
October 12, 2012 Hospital in Syrian city barely copes with wounded
October 16, 2012 Syrian rebels in Aleppo mostly poor, pious, rural
October 23, 2012 Aleppans stretched to limit in war for Syrian city
December 2, 2012 AP Exclusive: Strife hardens Syrian rebel brigade
Cover letter for entry

 

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2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Feature Writing

Eli Saslow, The Washington Post, for his moving portrait of a struggling swimming pool salesman that illustrates the daily emotional toll of the nation’s economic downturn.

 

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October 7, 2012 Life of a salesman
Cover letter for entry

 

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Eli Saslow is a staff writer at The Washington Post, where he writes narrative stories for the national staff.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Feature Writing

Kelley Benham, The Tampa Bay Tribune, St. Petersburg, Fla., for her searing personal account of the survival of her premature baby, born barely viable at 1 pound, 4 ounces, and her exploration of the costs and ethics of extreme medical intervention.

 

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December 9, 2012 Never let go: Part 1 - Lost and found
December 12, 2012 Never let go: Part 2 - The zero zone
December 16, 2012 Never let go: Part 3 - Baby's breath
Cover letter for entry

 

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Kelley Benham has been a writer and editor at the Tampa Bay Times since 2003.

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Editorial Writing

Jackson Diehl, The Washington Post, for his passionate editorials on the civil conflict in Syria, arguing for greater engagement by the United States to help stop bloodshed in a strategic Arab nation.

 

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March 8, 2012 Time to lead on Syria
March 23, 2012 An unworkable plan for Syria
April 22, 2012 Needed: Plan B for Syria
April 26, 2012 The U.N.’s monitors of death
May 11, 2012 As Syria burns
May 30, 2012 Who will stop Syria’s massacres?
June 1, 2012 What to do in Syria
July 7, 2012 Scapegoat for Syria
August 9, 2012 Syria’s hard core
December 30, 2012 Impotent on Syria
Cover letter for entry

 

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Jackson Diehl has been Deputy Editorial Page Editor at The Washington Post since November, 2000.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Editorial Writing

Staff of Newsday for its editorials in the chaotic wake of Hurricane Sandy, providing a voice of reason, hope and indignation as recovery began and the future challenge of limiting shoreline devastation emerged.

 

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October 31, 2012 Sandy challenges all of us
November 11, 2012 Sandy's devastating blow
November 15, 2012 Dear Mr. President
November 18, 2012 Pull the plug on LIPA
November 25, 2012 Folly to rebuild at the shore?
November 29, 2012 Avoid gas pains the next time
December 2, 2012 Anticipate worse than Sandy
December 9, 2012 Plug flood insurance holes
December 10, 2012 Don’t abandon, build smarter
December 30, 2012 Repair - and prepare
Cover letter for entry

 

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The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Criticism

Mary McNamara, the Los Angeles Times, for her searching television criticism that often becomes a springboard for provocative comments on the culture at large.

 

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February 5, 2012 A class act
April 13, 2012 'Girls' power is all too real
May 2, 2012 TV language can be a [female dog]
May 20, 2012 This fat kid's past flickers on tv screen
May 21, 2012 Dr. House holds to a prescription
June 22, 2012 Sorkin talk fest is no fun
September 9, 2012 Matters of faith and laughter
November 8, 2012 Failed mission for this 'Team'
November 24, 2012 Their sizzle fizzles in Liz & Dick
December 16, 2012 What happens after the fall?
Cover letter for entry

 

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Mary McNamarais has been senior culture editor and television critic at the Los Angeles Times since 2012.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Criticism

Manohla Dargis, The New York Times, for her enlightening movie criticism, vividly written and showing deep understanding of the business and art of filmmaking.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

January 28, 2012 At a subtler Sundance, one film sparkles
February 3, 2012 An indie champion and his life’s labors
March 18, 2012 'Napoleon' is lost, long live 'Napoleon'!
March 23, 2012 Tested by a picturesque dystopia
April 15, 2012 Unseen guide’s silent journeys to lyric nature
May 25, 2012 Scouting out a paradise: books, music and no adults
July 27, 2012 Rock musician shrouded in mystery of what might have been
November 2, 2012 Life takes nose dive, and settles into an abyss
November 16, 2012 The calm before the kablooey
December 19, 2012 Étude on aging, its graces, its indignities
Cover letter for entry

 

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Manohla Dargis is a chief film critic for The New York Times.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Commentary

Mike Di Ionno, The Star-Ledger, Newark, NJ, for his hard hitting columns on Hurricane Sandy, the death of a gay college student and other local events and issues.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

February 10, 2012 Victims' father envisions a different kind of justice
March 10, 2012 In life’s 2nd act, he took his gloves off so he could pick up his guitar
March 22, 2012 An exclusive interview: Dharun Ravi
April 3, 2012 New casino’s neighbor reveling in his little corner of the world
April 17, 2012 After principal’s untimely death, his lessons live on
May 18, 2012 A bond neither war nor death could break
September 10, 2012 Pathmark shooter’s final act leaves his grieving family in a private pain
November 1, 2012 In an instant, tourist mecca turns to ruins
November 2, 2012 We will come back.
November 27, 2012 What goes around...
Cover letter for entry

 

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Mark Di Ionno has been the general news columnist at The Star-Ledger for six years. He is the author of three books about New Jersey, and an adjunct professor of journalism at Rutgers-Newark, his alma mater.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Commentary

Juliette Kayyem, The Boston Globe, for her colorful, well reported columns on an array of issues, from women in combat to oil drilling in Alaska.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

February 2, 2012 War's glass ceiling
April 30, 2012 A revolution: women fight in Marines
May 17, 2012 Urging women to Be All That You Can't Be
June 16, 2012 "Proximity" debate has it backward
November 29, 2012 Combat exclusion rules aren't worth defending
July 19, 2012 The Manchurian mom?
May 24, 2012 The 'Joplin effect'
January 30, 2012 US has tied own hands as Cuba drills
March 22, 2012 Under melting ice, a jackpot
April 5, 2012 Don't let bin Laden's family become martyrs
Cover letter for entry

 

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Juliette N. Kayyem is a columnist for the Boston Globe where she writes on national security and foreign policy issues.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Explanatory Reporting

Dan Egan, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, for his exhaustive examination of the struggle to keep Asian carp and other invasive species from reaching the Great Lakes and ultimately all of the nation’s inland waters, a story enhanced by animated graphics.

 

-all links are to pdfs unless otherwise indicated-

August 19, 2012 Deep trouble: battle on the river
August 22, 2012 An invisible menace
August 26, 2012 Locked in controversy
August 19, 2012 How scientists use DNA to track Asian carp (Video)
December 16, 2012 An open wound
December 17, 2012 A river remedy
December 16, 2012 The wrong-way river (Video)
Cover letter for entry

 

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Dan Egan is the Great Lakes reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalists

Explanatory Reporting

Tony Bartelme, The Post and Courier, Charleston, S.C., for his stories that helped readers understand the complex factors driving up their insurance bills.

-all links are to pdfs-

June 3, 2012 Storm of money
December 2, 2012 The insider
June 24, 2012 Coastal property at mercy of wind pools
October 21, 2012 Long-term care ordeal for elderly
September 23, 2012 10 ways to fight back
Cover letter for entry

 

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Tony Bartelme is an investigative reporter for The Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina, with an extensive background in environmental and health issues.

Video of 2013 luncheon remarks

Pulitzer Prize Administrator Sig Gissler's introduction of Board Chair Paul Tash and Columbia University President Lee Bollinger, followed by remarks by Mr. Tash. From the 2013 Pulitzer Prize Luncheon, May 30, 2013.




Columbia University President Lee Bollinger's presentation of the 2013 Prizes at the Pulitzer Luncheon, May 30, 2013. President Bollinger is assisted by Sig Gissler, Pulitzer Prize Administrator.

Paul Tash 2013 luncheon remarks

Pulitzer Prize Ceremony
Thursday, May 30, 2013
Columbia University


Good afternoon.

It is a profound honor to represent my colleagues on the Pulitzer Prize board at this celebration of extraordinary work in arts, letters and journalism.

Let me acknowledge the board’s debt of gratitude to our dedicated administrator, Sig Gissler, and his colleagues on the Pulitzer staff. It is no mean feat to keep this machinery humming. The cycle that results today in 21 Pulitzer Prizes started with 2,637 entries. Sig and his colleagues tended that process, as they do every year, with excellent judgment and steady good cheer.

The board is also deeply grateful to the 102 authors, scholars, musicians and journalists who signed up for Pulitzer Prize jury duty. As many of you know, Pulitzer Prize winners have to make it through two rounds of judging. In the first stage, the juries winnow the entries down to three finalists in each category.

As the Pulitzer board periodically reminds the world, we have the option – by an extraordinary majority – to consider an entry that has not been nominated as a finalist in a given category. Even so, we occasionally give no prize at all. For the first time during my eight years on the Pulitzer Board, we found winners in all 21 categories from among those finalists recommended by our juries. That result speaks not only to the quality of our winners – which is superb – but to the judgment of our juries.

That is not to say that the board’s decisions this year were quick or easy. They rarely are. Indeed, the quality of the discussion and debate is what makes serving on the Pulitzer Board such a pleasure, surpassed – in my experience – only by my day job and my family. When I was elected to the Pulitzer board, Tom Friedman welcomed me to the “world’s best book club,” and that description certainly fits. But I also have come to think of the board as a wonderfully genial debating society.

For two days each April, we gather in the journalism school, around an oval table, in the room named for Joseph Pulitzer’s newspaper, the World. Without fail, the discussions reveal a deep reading of the finalists. Differences are respectful and friendly but full-throated, settled ultimately by a show of hands. Among board members, no score is kept, and no scores are settled. Any board member with a business or personal connection to a finalist is gently banished to the hallway for the discussion and the vote.

You may not always agree with the result. But in eight years on the board, I have never sniffed even a whiff of doubt about the integrity or the commitment of every board member to recognize the very best work. The process is as intellectually honest as humans can make it.

It is hard to win a Pulitzer Prize. This year, like every year, I left New York struck by the quality of many finalists who did not win a Pulitzer. This year that category included the winner of a National Book Award, a Harvard historian who has won the Pulitzer twice before, and a collection of short stories that won the richest international prize for such writing.

In journalism, the runners-up included an expose that fire retardants in furniture are mostly worthless and toxic, but an industry campaign of lies bamboozled government officials into requiring the chemicals anyway. Other finalists in journalism:
• Triggered a review of 20,000 criminal cases based on questionable forensic science, and got innocent people out of prison.
• Documented how a special police agency was failing to protect the residents of California’s homes for the profoundly disabled.
• Demonstrated how supposedly “non-profit” hospitals in North Carolina are running big surpluses while paying their executives seven-figure salaries and skimping on charity care.

What makes this year’s crop of Pulitzer finalists even more remarkable is the punishing economic pressure on most of the news organizations that have sponsored the work. My first Pulitzer board meeting was in 2006, a high-water mark in advertising revenues for American newspapers.

Since then, the combination of economic crisis and competition from digital alternatives has sent advertising revenues plummeting by more than half. Today, 15,000 fewer journalists have jobs at American newspapers than in 2006.

People outside our wonderful racket know that the commercial enterprises that have created most journalism are going through a rough stretch, so they ask whether the troubles have taken a toll on the Pulitzer Prizes. And the answer, to their surprise and a little to mine, is this: not one bit. The caliber of work that gets to the Pulitzer board is as strong as ever.

How to account for this paradox? Journalistic ambition burns both in organizations and individuals, despite the financial challenges. Bankruptcy may no longer carry particular stigma, but it remains a sign that an enterprise is under real financial strain. By my count, 11 of the 42 finalists in this year’s journalism categories come from journalists working at companies that have sought the shelter of bankruptcy protection. So do four of the 14 Pulitzer winners.

You can feel the strong pulse of journalistic ambition in organizations big and small. Toward one end of the scale, journalists from the New York Times won four Pulitzers this year. Like its other winners, the Times’ entry for international reporting was hugely demanding and expensive. Beyond the salaries and newsprint it took to publish that work, the incalculable cost may be in revenue lost, because the work imperils the company’s investments in China, a huge and growing market.

At the other end of the scale, our prize for national reporting goes to a start-up with a full-time staff of seven people and a history that goes back six years. An organization with neither much resource nor history takes the prize in a category that included all the usual suspects and plenty of heavyweights.

Now, we are about to turn to the most important business of today. The presentation of the Pulitzer Prizes is occasion not just for celebration, but also for inspiration. That is a point I will take from today’s ceremony, and indeed from all my experience on the Pulitzer board.

The work may be difficult. The odds may be long. The challenges may be great. So what? Every day presents an opportunity for excellence, and the chance to do work that makes a great difference. Wherever we labor in journalism, let us make it a labor of love.

Thank you very much.

Pulitzer Board chair praises tenacious journalism winners


Despite economic pressures and other stern challenges, the journalistic work of Pulitzer Prize winners is as strong as ever, the newly elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board said at the luncheon ceremony at Columbia University where the 2013 prizes in journalism, books, music and drama were presented.

Paul Tash, the chief executive of the Tampa Bay Times, Florida’s largest newspaper, urged newspapers and other news organizations to persist in facing current problems, saying:

“The work may be difficult. The odds may be long. The challenges may be great. So what? Every day presents an opportunity for excellence, and the chance to do work that makes a great difference.”

Tash, chairman and CEO of the Times Publishing Company, also paid tribute to the 102 Pulitzer jurors who reviewed more than 2,600 entries in 21 categories. The juries winnow the entries down to three finalists in each category. Tash was elected chair in April and will serve 12 months.

Text: Tash’s remarks
Press release: Tash’s election as chair