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Mike Pride, former Concord Monitor editor, elected Pulitzer Prize administrator

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media contacts:
Sig Gissler, sg138@columbia.edu, 212-854-7327
Sabina Lee, sabina.lee@columbia.edu, 212 854-5579


New York, N.Y., July 1, 2014 – Mike Pride, the former editor of the Concord Monitor who led his small New Hampshire newspaper to national prominence and served as co-chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board, has been named administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes.

The appointment, effective Sept. 1, was announced by the Pulitzer Board and by Lee C. Bollinger, president of Columbia University, where the prestigious prizes in journalism, letters, drama and music are administered.

Pride succeeds Sig Gissler, 78, former editor of The Milwaukee Journal and Columbia Journalism School faculty member, who will retire Aug. 1 after 12 years as administrator.

Pride, 67, became editor of the Monitor in 1983 after serving as managing editor. Under his leadership the Monitor won the New England Newspaper of the Year Award 19 times, as well as numerous national awards for excellence. The paper was cited by Time magazine and the Columbia Journalism Review as one of the best papers in the country. In 2008, the Monitor won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.

"Mike Pride is the ideal candidate to take the Pulitzer Prizes into their next phase," said Danielle Allen, a professor of social science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., and the Pulitzer Board chair who led the search committee that tapped Pride. "He is committed to a free press and community journalism as pillars of democracy. He is a warm person of sound judgment and inspiring creativity. His deep experience with the Prizes equips him brilliantly to help us navigate the new while also steering a course true to our original values."

President Bollinger, whose father was a small town newspaper publisher in Oregon and California, said: "There’s no greater honor for Columbia, where our Journalism School was founded by Joseph Pulitzer, than to administer the iconic prizes he also established here nearly a century ago for excellence in American journalism, arts and letters. In Mike Pride, the Pulitzer Board has found a worthy successor to the admired Sig Gissler. Mike has not only been a member and chair of the Board, but the Concord Monitor earned its own Pulitzer during his extraordinary editorial leadership. We much look forward to welcoming him to our campus community in the years ahead."

In addition to Allen and Bollinger, the search committee consisted of Pulitzer Board members Paul Gigot, editorial page editor, The Wall Street Journal, and Steve Coll, dean of the Journalism School; Paul Tash, chairman and CEO of the Tampa Bay Times, the immediate past chair of the Pulitzer Board; and Ann Marie Lipinski, curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University, a former Board member who served as counsel to the committee.

Pride joined the Pulitzer Board in 1999 and served as co-chair in 2008, his final year on the body. He also served four times as a Pulitzer juror, twice as a jury chair. "I am deeply honored to have been chosen as administrator," Pride said. "I will serve the Pulitzer Board in every way possible to carry out its mission of identifying and celebrating excellence in American journalism, arts and letters.” (See appended full statement by Pride.)

Pride retired from the Monitor in 2008 but returned in 2014 to serve briefly as editor during a management transition. He retired again in May of 2014 but still writes columns for the paper.

A graduate of the University of South Florida, Pride served as a Russian linguist in the Army during the late 1960s. He began his journalism career as a sports writer at the Tampa Tribune and later served as city editor of the Clearwater Sun and the Tallahassee Democrat. Pride, a former Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, has won numerous awards. In 1987, he was named the National Press Foundation's Editor of the Year for directing the Monitor's coverage of the Challenger disaster and death of New Hampshire school teacher Christa McAuliffe. In 1997, Pride won the Yankee Quill Award for contributions to New England journalism.

A lover of history and poetry, Pride is the co-author of My Brave Boys, a Civil War history, and Too Dead to Die, the memoir of a Bataan Death March survivor. Pride has taught a presidential politics course at Gettysburg College and has also been a lecturer and tour guide at the college's Civil War Institute. In 2005, 2008 and 2010 he was a Hoover Media Fellow at Stanford University.

A former chairman of the Small Newspapers Committee of the American Society of News Editors, Pride also served on the society’s writing awards board. He is a member of the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award committee at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.

Edward (Bud) Kliment, who has been deputy administrator since 1994, will serve as acting administrator during the month before Pride begins his tenure on Sept. 1.

The administrator's office works with the Board on a wide range of activities, including selection of juries, prize deliberations, committee work and arranging the twice-annual meetings of the Board, which chooses the winners each April.

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The Pulitzer Prizes were established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and newspaper publisher, who left money to Columbia University upon his death in 1911. A portion of his bequest was used to found the School of Journalism in 1912 and establish the Pulitzer Prizes, which were first awarded in 1917.

The 19-member Pulitzer Board is composed mainly of leading journalists or news executives from media outlets across the U.S., as well as five academics or persons in the arts. The dean of Columbia's journalism school and the administrator of the prizes are nonvoting members. The chair rotates annually to the most senior member or members. The board is self-perpetuating in the election of members. Voting members may serve three terms of three years for a total of nine years.

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STATEMENT BY MIKE PRIDE
New administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes
July 1, 2014

I am deeply honored to have been chosen as administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes. I will serve the Pulitzer Board in every way possible to carry out its mission of identifying and celebrating excellence in American journalism, arts and letters and music. I look forward to the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzers in 2016 and the opportunity it provides both to reflect on the great work the prizes have rewarded and to spur conversation about what constitutes excellence as we look to the second 100 years.

For nine of my 30 years running the newsroom of the Concord Monitor, I served on the Board of the Pulitzer Prizes. It was one of the highlights of my career – an earnest, merit-based search each year for the very best in journalism, books, plays and musical compositions. In 2008, I left the Monitor for a new life as a historian, author, freelancer and blogger. The retirement of Sig Gissler as Pulitzer administrator opened one of the few jobs that seemed worthier to me than these happy pursuits.

In a rapidly changing social and technological age, the Pulitzer Prizes remain a beacon, defining and championing the values of a free press. I look forward to doing all in my power to keep their light strong.

Video of 2014 luncheon remarks

Remarks by Danielle Allen, Pulitzer Prize Board chair, at the 2014 Pulitzer Prize Luncheon, May 28, 2014.




Columbia University President Lee Bollinger's presentation of the 2014 Prizes at the Pulitzer Luncheon, May 28, 2014. President Bollinger is assisted by Sig Gissler, Pulitzer Prize Administrator.

Board chair links 2014 prizes to health of democracy

The Pulitzer Prizes play an important role in helping America honor its commitment to democracy, the newly elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board told the luncheon ceremony at Columbia University where the 2014 prizes in journalism, books, music and drama were presented.

Drawing on the Declaration of Independence for inspiration, Danielle Allen, a political philosopher at the Institute for Advanced Study, said that in a complicated world "deep reporting in the pursuit of truth, effective writing in pursuit of insight and edification, and unflagging advocacy of a culture of reading" gave hope for the nation’s future.

She described the Pulitzer Board’s deliberations as "the most intense, forthright, rigorous and collegial of any I’ve ever been privileged to be part of." -- 05/28/2014

Text: Allen's remarks

Press release: Allen's election as chair

Books, Drama and Music entry site is open

The online site for submitting entries in the 2015 Pulitzer competitions in Books, Drama and Music is now open. Entry information and payments must be submitted online and hard copies of entry materials then sent to the Pulitzer Prize office. Please see our How to Enter page for information on eligibility, how to submit work, competition deadlines and a link to the entry site. -- 05/15/2014

read more...

Pulitzer winners celebrate!

On April 14, 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners in journalism and the arts from across the country uncorked the champagne and cheered in celebration.

At left, David Philipps, of The Gazette, Colorado Springs, winner of the National Reporting prize, waves his bottle next to photographer Michael Ciaglo. Awarded for "Other than Honorable," a story that expanded the examination of how wounded combat veterans are mistreated, this is the newspaper's second Pulitzer win in its 124-year history.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizes will be awarded at a luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City on May 28, 2014. -- 04/21/2014

List of 2014 winners

Video of announcement

News stories about winners

Work by 2014 Journalism Finalists is available

Our expanded archive now includes articles and other entry material submitted by finalists for the 2014 Journalism Prizes.

Three finalists in each category are selected by separate Nominating Juries. The Pulitzer Prize Board chooses the winner from among the three finalists. The other two entries, not selected as Prize winners, are designated as Nominated Finalists.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 14, 2014. -- 04/24/2014

Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler to retire

Sig Gissler, who helped move the Pulitzer Prizes more deeply into the digital age, will retire as administrator this summer, Columbia University announced today.

Gissler, 78, became the Pulitzer administrator in 2002. During his tenure, the Pulitzer Board opened its journalism competition to entries from online-only news organizations and encouraged a full range of digital components, such as video and other multimedia formats. Three years ago, the journalism Prizes adopted an all-digital entry and judging system, replacing paper entries.

"For a dozen years, Sig has been a devoted and wise steward of the Pulitzer Prizes and the machinery that produces them," said Paul Tash, chairman of the Pulitzer Board. "It is a little hard to imagine the Prizes without him." -- 01/15/2014

read more...

Investigative journalist and columnist join Pulitzer Board

Katherine Boo, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist, and Gail Collins, an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, have been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Boo, a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, was a reporter at The Washington Post when her series on mistreatment of mentally challenged people in Washington, D.C., resulted in the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for The Post.

Collins joined the editorial board of The New York Times in 1995 and six years later became the first woman editor of The Times’ editorial page. -- 11/07/2013

read more...

VIDEO of Pulitzer seminar: "Waiting to be told"

Here is the video of six journalists who deconstructed their 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning work and shared their tips during an Oct. 22 seminar at the Columbia Journalism School. They told how their remarkable stories were waiting to be discovered. The topics and participants were:

Speeding off-duty cops imperil the public
Sun Sentinel, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla, Public Service Prize, Sally Kestin and John Maines

The biggest oil spill you never heard of
InsideClimate News, National Reporting Prize, Elizabeth McGowan and Lisa Song

Inside a deadly backcountry avalanche
The New York Times, Feature Writing Prize, John Branch and Steve Duenes

Sheila Coronel, director, Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, moderated the program. -- 11/04/2013

watch slide show of the event |
watch video of the event

read more...

2013 Journalism Jurors searched for nation’s best journalism

Watch a slide show of the hardworking Nominating Jurors in Journalism. Jurors met on February 22, 23 and 24, 2013 to read 1,081 journalism entries online. They worked in both the Pulitzer World Room (pictured right) and the Lecture Hall also located in Pulitzer Hall at Columbia University.

The jurors nominated three finalists in each category. Then The Pulitzer Prize Board made the final decisions. The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 15, 2013.




Danielle Allen 2014 luncheon remarks

Pulitzer Prize Ceremony
Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Columbia University


"Let Facts Be Submitted to a Candid World"


Hello and welcome ….

What a special and historic opportunity this is—what a great privilege and honor—to celebrate all the remarkably gifted and passionate writers, reporters, artists, editors, and publishers filling this rotunda today. We’ve gathered here to celebrate you, one another, and our common democratic enterprise.

As we begin, though, I’d like to call your attention to a small, special book that is not otherwise on our agenda. It’s called Wild about Books. Fear not: we’re not creating an impromptu Pulitzer. I cite this sweet children’s book by Judy Sierra as a sort of parable: the animals at the zoo get a library and what a transformation it is. In no time at all, they become poets and novelists and some of them literal bookworms. Day to day, as their culture of reading grows, the joy crescendos. The grandest day in the zoo comes when the zookeepers award—get this—the "Zoolitzer" prizes. How do I know about the "Zoolitzers"? At home I’ve got a 4 year old and a 2 year old who love the book, and as far as they are concerned, that’s what Mama’s doing in New York today: doling out the Zoolitzers. And—let me tell you-- they are really excited for all of you . . . except they were hoping for selfies with hippos, giraffes, and crocodiles.

In all seriousness, who can think about kids without thinking about the future? In my case, being a political philosopher, I can’t think about the future without thinking about democracy and wondering what will become of it. Will we keep it? What does it take to build and sustain it? Joseph Pulitzer wondered about similar matters and the prizes he created are part of his attempt to contribute to a solution. In 1904, he wrote: "Our Republic and its press will rise or fall together."

For me the easiest way to get at the essence of democracy is to quote my favorite sentence from the Declaration of Independence. It’s not the sentence you’re expecting. Instead it’s this one: "[L]et facts be submitted to a candid world."

The authors of the Declaration began by asserting that "when in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another. . . a decent respect for the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation."

The colonists wished to separate from Great Britain. They believed that they needed to give reasons. Fundamentally, their reason for revolution was this: "[that] the history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations." After they made this allegation, they laid out the content of their investigative report—a long list of 18 grievances against the King. They introduced that list of grievances with those words I love, "To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world."

But what is this idea of a candid world?

One reads it in the Declaration and feels nearly ready to dismiss it as the romantic fantasy of a now lost era. How unfamiliar it sounds to our twenty-first century ears when the writers of the Declaration declare themselves bound by a decent respect for the opinions of mankind to present the causes of their action.

When they say this, they call out to the world for judgment. They call out, therefore, to a world that they expect will recognize the value of judgment based on shared facts and reason-giving; they call out to a world that they believe has the capacity to judge their actions fairly.

This is the core idea of democracy: anybody and everybody can take part in analyzing and interpreting the shape and meaning of our world, divining the currents that are evident in the course of events. Anybody and everybody can use their findings together with good arguments to forge the collective decisions that will provide our best bridge to a decent future.

Yet in our current circumstances, this idea of "a candid world" must sound—as it must have sounded even to many of those who lived in those revolutionary times—hopelessly utopian.

Indeed, the writers of the Declaration hedged their claim. They qualified it. They wish to convey, they say, "a decent respect" for the opinions of mankind. They recognize that human beings have an inherent capacity for judgments about fairness, but to think that all people everywhere always judge fairly would be far-fetched, if not extravagant.

A decent respect is a modest but fair level of respect. A decent respect entails no more than expecting most people to judge fairly most of the time. As Abraham Lincoln may – or may not – have said: "You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time."

Yet even with this qualification, the writers of the Declaration can still sound implausibly optimistic, if not naive. Can we still as a culture claim to be in possession of anything like that decent respect for the opinions of mankind?

In fact, I believe that everyone who is joined in this room today is in possession of such respect. If anything, I believe that is why you are here. The power of your work—an article, an essay, a photograph, a poem or a book— emanates from your philanthropic stance toward your audience, indeed, toward humankind. You believe that we, your readers, have the capacity to assimilate, to respond to, and to judge your picture of the world. You too call out to a candid world.

To address oneself to a candid world, however, is to do far more than to act on a belief in a core human capacity. The authors of the Declaration did not so much describe the world known to them as set a marker for an aspiration.

A candid world is achieved, not received. It is not a gift from on high but the work of minds self-consciously applied. In presenting their facts to a candid world 238 years ago, the writers of the Declaration sought to call such a world into being. They were making a demand of their audience – which was made up not just of inhabitants of the colonies but the global public too. They were asking this audience to achieve a new standard of political decision-making.

In the Declaration, they show their audience the rudiments of that activity: the declaration of principle, the consideration of facts relevant to those principles, the discernment of meaning in contemporary situations, the proposal of responses to those circumstances. All this work was to be done together with others and is far more relevant to all of us today than you might think. The goal was that public choices should be fairly forged in a crucible of public opinion.

Perhaps we will never achieve a truly candid world, but I remain convinced that these are still the elements necessary even to approximate it.

Can these ruminations on the Declaration help us understand Joseph Pulitzer’s aspirations and ambitions for the prizes he created? Pulitzer continued his 1904 thoughts on democracy thus: "An able, disinterested, public-spirited press, with trained intelligence to know the right and courage to do it, can preserve that public virtue without which popular government is a sham and a mockery. A cynical, mercenary, demagogic press will produce in time a people as base as itself. The power to mould the future of the Republic will be in the hands of the journalists of future generations."

How do we in the World Room, where the Pulitzer Board gathers, judge texts against Pulitzer’s high standard? Well, let’s take the Declaration as our sample. It pre-dates the prizes, of course, but can serve for an afternoon’s parlor game.

First off, we can confirm: the Declaration would have been eligible for a Pulitzer Prize. After all, it was published in newspapers throughout the fledgling country. How, then, would it have fared? I suppose that would depend on the category in which it was entered. It would probably not have done terribly well in "Investigative Reporting." The list of grievances against King George is comprehensive, it does rest on deep reporting, and it provides a compelling account of tyranny, but we never hear from the other side. What’s more, we can easily identify hyperbole in some of the grievances. The list was not really intended to be an investigative report. After all, as John Adams put it, "Posterity must hear a Story that shall make their Ears to Tingle."

Maybe "Editorial" would have been a better fit. There the test of excellence is "clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion." The Declaration would surely have been a strong contender in that category.

As to its suitability for the "public service category," I leave that to you to judge.

Our deliberations in the World Room are the most intense, forthright, rigorous, and collegial of any I’ve ever been privileged to be part of. They have to be. Pulitzer has given us a demanding task. Our charge is to select those exemplary cases of journalistic, literary, and artistic excellence whose bright light helps us all pick out the path toward a healthy republic. In my eight years on the board, I have been overwhelmed by the intellectual power and moral integrity exhibited by our contenders. They give us reason to hope. Yet I also think it is time for anyone with a public audience to re-double her efforts, his efforts to cultivate a candid world.

As I now reflect on the future that lies before my children, I am struck above all that they were born in this early twenty-first century world, the post September 11th world. For them, there is no before and after, just this, what we know now with its ever present culture of security.

Ten days after September 11th, I was obliged to give a speech to the incoming freshman class at the University of Chicago.

With them, too, I invoked the Declaration of Independence, and its commitment to moving toward the future as if in a candid world. I celebrated the aspiration to ask the most of humankind. My concern at the time was that under pressure, in the face of terror, we might come to view our openness, our civil liberties and our commitment to educating all comers – what you might call our democratic magnanimity – as one reason for our vulnerability. I was concerned that we would need to work hard to preserve our core democratic commitments. At the time I wrote: "A democracy is not weak for opening itself to the world, nor for allowing its citizens great liberties. To the contrary. It is not merely that openness and rights make us who we are as democrats; they also make us strong, for they alone inspire the consent, allegiance, and commitment on which democratic power rests. Democratic authority rests on the state’s securing a way of life that we are glad to share, and on nothing else."

Now, in 2014, thirteen years later, I realize that the question is not whether we can preserve democratic commitments but rather, whether we can rebuild a commitment to a candid world almost from scratch. For all those who have been born in this world, who have never known another world, can we teach them, as the authors of the Declaration once did, what a commitment to a candid world looks like? Can we help them, I wonder, embrace this ideal afresh? How do we wrest a candid world from a morass of deception, self-promotion, and demagoguery, one that comes at us at all levels and that pervades our institutional structures, both in the nation and around the world?

As alarmist or even despondent as that might sound, I am not without hope, for we have methods which are tried and true: deep reporting in pursuit of the truth, effective writing in pursuit of insight and edification, and unflagging advocacy of a culture of reading, and not merely of watching and listening. Reading simply and unequivocally is the most efficient way to deepen and broaden understanding. I think Joseph Pulitzer was right when he said: "An able, disinterested, public-spirited press, with trained intelligence to know the right and courage to do it, can preserve that public virtue without which popular government is a sham and a mockery." To sit around the World Room table and to debate your work is to have one’s optimism restored.

All of you in this Rotunda wield with sublime mastery those tools of reporting and writing. You are, to a person, potent advocates for a culture of thoughtful reading. We are counting on you to build that candid world. We are counting on ourselves to emulate you, to follow along the path you’ve lit up.

And now, if you’ll pardon the expression, let’s give out those Zoolitzers. Over to you, President Bollinger.

Danielle Allen, widely known scholar, elected Pulitzer Board chair

Danielle Allen, a versatile scholar whose intellectual interests span the classics, philosophy and political theory, has been elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Allen, the UPS Foundation Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., replaces Paul Tash, chairman and CEO of the Times Publishing Company, which publishes the Tampa Bay Times. Allen, the first African American woman to chair the Board, has published broadly in democratic theory, political sociology and the history of political thought. -- 05/01/2014

read more...

Pulitzer winners celebrate!

On April 14, 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners in journalism and the arts from across the country uncorked the champagne and cheered in celebration.

At left, David Philipps, of The Gazette, Colorado Springs, winner of the National Reporting prize, waves his bottle next to photographer Michael Ciaglo. Awarded for "Other than Honorable," a story that expanded the examination of how wounded combat veterans are mistreated, this is the newspaper's second Pulitzer win in its 124-year history.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizes will be awarded at a luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City on May 28, 2014. -- 04/21/2014

List of 2014 winners

Video of announcement

News stories about winners

Work by 2014 Journalism Finalists is available

Our expanded archive now includes articles and other entry material submitted by finalists for the 2014 Journalism Prizes.

Three finalists in each category are selected by separate Nominating Juries. The Pulitzer Prize Board chooses the winner from among the three finalists. The other two entries, not selected as Prize winners, are designated as Nominated Finalists.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 14, 2014. -- 04/24/2014

Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler to retire

Sig Gissler, who helped move the Pulitzer Prizes more deeply into the digital age, will retire as administrator this summer, Columbia University announced today.

Gissler, 78, became the Pulitzer administrator in 2002. During his tenure, the Pulitzer Board opened its journalism competition to entries from online-only news organizations and encouraged a full range of digital components, such as video and other multimedia formats. Three years ago, the journalism Prizes adopted an all-digital entry and judging system, replacing paper entries.

"For a dozen years, Sig has been a devoted and wise steward of the Pulitzer Prizes and the machinery that produces them," said Paul Tash, chairman of the Pulitzer Board. "It is a little hard to imagine the Prizes without him." -- 01/15/2014

read more...

Investigative journalist and columnist join Pulitzer Board

Katherine Boo, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist, and Gail Collins, an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, have been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Boo, a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, was a reporter at The Washington Post when her series on mistreatment of mentally challenged people in Washington, D.C., resulted in the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for The Post.

Collins joined the editorial board of The New York Times in 1995 and six years later became the first woman editor of The Times’ editorial page. -- 11/07/2013

read more...

VIDEO of Pulitzer seminar: "Waiting to be told"

Here is the video of six journalists who deconstructed their 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning work and shared their tips during an Oct. 22 seminar at the Columbia Journalism School. They told how their remarkable stories were waiting to be discovered. The topics and participants were:

Speeding off-duty cops imperil the public
Sun Sentinel, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla, Public Service Prize, Sally Kestin and John Maines

The biggest oil spill you never heard of
InsideClimate News, National Reporting Prize, Elizabeth McGowan and Lisa Song

Inside a deadly backcountry avalanche
The New York Times, Feature Writing Prize, John Branch and Steve Duenes

Sheila Coronel, director, Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, moderated the program. -- 11/04/2013

watch slide show of the event |
watch video of the event

read more...

Pulitzer Board chair praises tenacious 2013 journalism winners


Despite economic pressures and other stern challenges, the journalistic work of Pulitzer Prize winners is as strong as ever, the newly elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board said at the luncheon ceremony at Columbia University where the 2013 prizes in journalism, books, music and drama were presented.

Paul Tash, the chief executive of the Tampa Bay Times, Florida’s largest newspaper, urged newspapers and other news organizations to persist in facing current problems, saying:

"The work may be difficult. The odds may be long. The challenges may be great. So what? Every day presents an opportunity for excellence, and the chance to do work that makes a great difference." 05/30/2013

Text: Tash’s remarks

Video: Tash’s remarks and presentation of Prizes

Luncheon slide show

Press release: Tash’s election as chair

2013 Journalism Jurors searched for nation’s best journalism

Watch a slide show of the hardworking Nominating Jurors in Journalism. Jurors met on February 22, 23 and 24, 2013 to read 1,081 journalism entries online. They worked in both the Pulitzer World Room (pictured right) and the Lecture Hall also located in Pulitzer Hall at Columbia University.

The jurors nominated three finalists in each category. Then The Pulitzer Prize Board made the final decisions. The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 15, 2013.




Danielle Allen, widely known scholar, elected chair of Pulitzer Prize Board

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact
Sabina Lee, sabina.lee@columbia.edu or (212) 854-5579


New York, N.Y. (May 1, 2014) -- Danielle Allen, a versatile scholar whose intellectual interests span the classics, philosophy and political theory, has been elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board, Columbia University announced today.

Allen, the UPS Foundation Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., replaces Paul Tash, chairman and CEO of the Times Publishing Company, which publishes the Tampa Bay Times, Florida’s largest newspaper. Board members serve a maximum of nine years while a chair serves for only one year.

Allen, the first African American woman to chair the Board, has published broadly in democratic theory, political sociology and the history of political thought. Widely known for her work on justice and citizenship in both ancient Athens and modern America, Allen is the author of "The World of Prometheus: the Politics of Punishing in Democratic Athens" (2000), "Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown vs. the Board of Education" (2004), and "Why Plato Wrote" (2010). Her latest book, "Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality," will be published in June.

In 2002, Allen was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship for her ability "to combine the classicist’s careful attention to texts and language with the political theorist’s sophisticated and informed engagement." She is currently working on books on citizenship in the digital age, and on education and equality. Allen is a frequent public lecturer and regular guest on public radio affiliates to discuss issues of citizenship, as well as an occasional contributor on similar subjects to The Washington Post and to periodicals such as Boston Review, Democracy, Cabinet and The Nation.

A graduate of Princeton University with an A.B. degree in classics, Allen received a Ph.D. in classics from Cambridge University in 1996 and a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University in 2001. Joining the University of Chicago faculty in 1997, she was a professor in the departments of classics and political science and in the Committee on Social Thought. She also served as the university’s dean of the division of humanities, leaving in 2007 for a position at the Institute for Advanced Study.

Born in Maryland, raised in California, and a lover of poetry, Allen has been a member of the Pulitzer Board since 2006. A former trustee of Princeton University, she is a trustee of Amherst College, a board member at the Mellon Foundation, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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The Pulitzer Prizes, which are administered at Columbia University, were established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and newspaper publisher, who left money to Columbia University upon his death in 1911. A portion of his bequest was used to found the School of Journalism in 1912 and establish the Pulitzer Prizes, which were first awarded in 1917.

The 19-member board is composed mainly of leading journalists or news executives from media outlets across the U.S., as well as five academics or persons in the arts. The dean of Columbia's journalism school and the administrator of the prizes are nonvoting members. The chair rotates annually to the most senior member or members. The board is self-perpetuating in the election of members. Voting members may serve three terms of three years for a total of nine years.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Feature Photography

Michael Williamson of The Washington Post for his portfolio of pictures exploring the multi-faceted impact of the nation’s food stamp program on 47 million recipients.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

<< Back to Nominated Finalists for 2014

<< Back to Feature Photography Winner for 2014

 


Michael S. Williamson joined The Washington Post in 1993.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Feature Photography

Lacy Atkins of the San Francisco Chronicle for her revealing portrait of an Oakland school's efforts to help African-American boys avoid neighborhood risks and profit from education.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

<< Back to Nominated Finalists for 2014

<< Back to Feature Photography Winner for 2014

 


Lacy Atkins has been a photojournalist for more than 20 years. She joined the San Francisco Chronicle in 2000.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Breaking News Photography

Goran Tomasevic of Reuters for his sequence of photographs that chronicle two hours of fierce combat on the rebel frontline in Syria's civil war.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

<< Back to Nominated Finalists for 2014

<< Back to Breaking News Photography Winner for 2014

 


Goran Tomasevic was born in Belgrade in 1969 and has worked as a photojournalist in conflict zones since war engulfed his native Yugoslavia in 1991.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Breaking News Photography

John Tlumacki and David L. Ryan, The Boston Globe, for their searing photographs that captured the shock, chaos and heroism after the bloody Boston Marathon bombings.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

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John Tlumacki has been a staff photographer for The Boston Globe since 1981.

David L. Ryan is a staff photographer at The Boston Globe.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Editorial Cartooning

Pat Bagley, The Salt Lake Tribune, for his adroit use of images and words that cut to the core of often emotional issues for his readership.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

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In 1978, Pat Bagley was hired by The Salt Lake Tribune and has been a popular feature of the paper ever since.

Announcement of 2014 Pulitzer Prize winners

Video of Pulitzer Prize Administrator Sig Gissler announcing the 2014 Pulitzer Prize winners on April 14, 2014. The announcement took place at 3:00 pm eastern daylight time, in the Joseph Pulitzer World Room at the Journalism School, Columbia University.










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2014 Pulitzer winners celebrate!

On April 14, 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners in journalism and the arts from across the country uncorked the champagne and cheered in celebration.

At left, David Philipps, of The Gazette, Colorado Springs, winner of the National Reporting prize, waves his bottle next to photographer Michael Ciaglo. Awarded for "Other than Honorable," a story that expanded the examination of how wounded combat veterans are mistreated, this is the newspaper's second Pulitzer win in its 124 year history.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizes will be awarded at a luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City on May 28, 2014.

List of 2014 winners

Video of announcement

Work by 2014 Journalism Finalists is available

Our expanded archive now includes articles and other entry material submitted by finalists for the 2014 Journalism Prizes.

Three finalists in each category are selected by separate Nominating Juries. The Pulitzer Prize Board chooses the winner from among the three finalists. The other two entries, not selected as Prize winners, are designated as Nominated Finalists.

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 14, 2014. -- 04/24/2014



Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler to retire

Sig Gissler, who helped move the Pulitzer Prizes more deeply into the digital age, will retire as administrator this summer, Columbia University announced today.

Gissler, 78, became the Pulitzer administrator in 2002. During his tenure, the Pulitzer Board opened its journalism competition to entries from online-only news organizations and encouraged a full range of digital components, such as video and other multimedia formats. Three years ago, the journalism Prizes adopted an all-digital entry and judging system, replacing paper entries.

"For a dozen years, Sig has been a devoted and wise steward of the Pulitzer Prizes and the machinery that produces them," said Paul Tash, chairman of the Pulitzer Board. "It is a little hard to imagine the Prizes without him."

read more...

Investigative journalist and columnist join Pulitzer Board

Katherine Boo, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist, and Gail Collins, an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, have been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Boo, a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, was a reporter at The Washington Post when her series on mistreatment of mentally challenged people in Washington, D.C., resulted in the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for The Post.

Collins joined the editorial board of The New York Times in 1995 and six years later became the first woman editor of The Times’ editorial page. -- 11/07/2013

read more...

VIDEO of Pulitzer seminar: "Waiting to be told"

Here is the video of six journalists who deconstructed their 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning work and shared their tips during an Oct. 22 seminar at the Columbia Journalism School. They told how their remarkable stories were waiting to be discovered. The topics and participants were:

Speeding off-duty cops imperil the public
Sun Sentinel, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla, Public Service Prize, Sally Kestin and John Maines

The biggest oil spill you never heard of
InsideClimate News, National Reporting Prize, Elizabeth McGowan and Lisa Song

Inside a deadly backcountry avalanche
The New York Times, Feature Writing Prize, John Branch and Steve Duenes

Sheila Coronel, director, Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, moderated the program. -- 11/04/2013

watch slide show of the event |
watch video of the event

read more...

Pulitzer Board chair praises tenacious 2013 journalism winners


Despite economic pressures and other stern challenges, the journalistic work of Pulitzer Prize winners is as strong as ever, the newly elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board said at the luncheon ceremony at Columbia University where the 2013 prizes in journalism, books, music and drama were presented.

Paul Tash, the chief executive of the Tampa Bay Times, Florida’s largest newspaper, urged newspapers and other news organizations to persist in facing current problems, saying:

"The work may be difficult. The odds may be long. The challenges may be great. So what? Every day presents an opportunity for excellence, and the chance to do work that makes a great difference." 05/30/2013

Text: Tash’s remarks

Video: Tash’s remarks and presentation of Prizes

Luncheon slide show

Press release: Tash’s election as chair

John Daniszewski, AP news executive, joins Pulitzer Board

John Daniszewski, a top news executive at the Associated Press with deep experience in the coverage of major world news events, has been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Daniszewski became AP’s vice president and senior managing editor for international news in 2009 after three decades as a reporter, editor and correspondent who has been on assignment in more than 70 countries in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia.-- 05/01/2013

read more...


2013 Journalism Jurors searched for nation’s best journalism

Watch a slide show of the hardworking Nominating Jurors in Journalism. Jurors met on February 22, 23 and 24, 2013 to read 1,081 journalism entries online. They worked in both the Pulitzer World Room (pictured right) and the Lecture Hall also located in Pulitzer Hall at Columbia University.

The jurors nominated three finalists in each category. Then The Pulitzer Prize Board made the final decisions. The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 15, 2013.




pre-anouncement home page

The 2014 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists will be announced Monday, April 14, 2014 at Columbia University in New York City. The announcement will take place at 3:00pm eastern daylight time. Finalists are not announced in advance.

Winners' biographies and photos will be available on this Website, along with winning stories, photos and cartoons in all 14 Journalism categories. Synposes of winning books, and samples from winners in drama and music will also be online.

Please check back on April 14!


Pulitzer Administrator Sig Gissler to retire

Sig Gissler, who helped move the Pulitzer Prizes more deeply into the digital age, will retire as administrator this summer, Columbia University announced today.

Gissler, 78, became the Pulitzer administrator in 2002. During his tenure, the Pulitzer Board opened its journalism competition to entries from online-only news organizations and encouraged a full range of digital components, such as video and other multimedia formats. Three years ago, the journalism Prizes adopted an all-digital entry and judging system, replacing paper entries.

"For a dozen years, Sig has been a devoted and wise steward of the Pulitzer Prizes and the machinery that produces them," said Paul Tash, chairman of the Pulitzer Board. "It is a little hard to imagine the Prizes without him."

read more...

Investigative journalist and columnist join Pulitzer Board

Katherine Boo, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist, and Gail Collins, an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, have been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Boo, a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, was a reporter at The Washington Post when her series on mistreatment of mentally challenged people in Washington, D.C., resulted in the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for The Post.

Collins joined the editorial board of The New York Times in 1995 and six years later became the first woman editor of The Times’ editorial page. -- 11/07/2013

read more...

VIDEO of Pulitzer seminar: "Waiting to be told"

Here is the video of six journalists who deconstructed their 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winning work and shared their tips during an Oct. 22 seminar at the Columbia Journalism School. They told how their remarkable stories were waiting to be discovered. The topics and participants were:

Speeding off-duty cops imperil the public
Sun Sentinel, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla, Public Service Prize, Sally Kestin and John Maines

The biggest oil spill you never heard of
InsideClimate News, National Reporting Prize, Elizabeth McGowan and Lisa Song

Inside a deadly backcountry avalanche
The New York Times, Feature Writing Prize, John Branch and Steve Duenes

Sheila Coronel, director, Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, moderated the program. -- 11/04/2013

watch slide show of the event |
watch video of the event

read more...

Work by 2013 Journalism Finalists is available

Our expanded archive now includes articles and other entry material submitted by finalists for the 2013 Journalism Prizes.

Three finalists in each category are selected by separate Nominating Juries. The Pulitzer Prize Board chooses the winner from among the three finalists. The other two entries, not selected as Prize winners, are designated as Nominated Finalists.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prizewinners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 15, 2013. -- 09/06/2013



Pulitzer Board chair praises tenacious journalism winners


Despite economic pressures and other stern challenges, the journalistic work of Pulitzer Prize winners is as strong as ever, the newly elected chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board said at the luncheon ceremony at Columbia University where the 2013 prizes in journalism, books, music and drama were presented.

Paul Tash, the chief executive of the Tampa Bay Times, Florida’s largest newspaper, urged newspapers and other news organizations to persist in facing current problems, saying:

"The work may be difficult. The odds may be long. The challenges may be great. So what? Every day presents an opportunity for excellence, and the chance to do work that makes a great difference." 05/30/2013

Text: Tash’s remarks

Video: Tash’s remarks and presentation of Prizes


Luncheon slide show


Press release: Tash’s election as chair

John Daniszewski, AP news executive, joins Pulitzer Board

John Daniszewski, a top news executive at the Associated Press with deep experience in the coverage of major world news events, has been elected to the Pulitzer Prize Board.

Daniszewski became AP’s vice president and senior managing editor for international news in 2009 after three decades as a reporter, editor and correspondent who has been on assignment in more than 70 countries in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia.-- 05/01/2013

read more...


2013 Pulitzer winners celebrate!

On April 15, 2013 Pulitzer Prizewinners in journalism and the arts from across the country jumped up and cheered in celebration.

At left, database specialist John Maines, investigative reporter Sally Kestin and the Sun Sentinel newsroom react to the news that the Sun Sentinal has won the Pulitzer for Public Service. Awarded for "Above the Law: Speeding Cops," a series about off-duty police officers endangering the lives of citizens by speeding, this is the newspaper's first ever Pulitzer win.

The 2013 Pulitzer Prizes in all categories were awarded at a luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City on May 30, 2013.

List of 2013 winners


Caroline Shaw, musician, wins Pulitzer for "Partita"

"At 30, Shaw is the youngest-ever winner of the music Pulitzer. Shaw says she considers herself a musician first — and, in fact, Partita for 8 Voices was written for the vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth, of which she is a member.

"There's one moment in the piece that delivers on that name, where the sung music morphs into a mounting swell of cacophonous, indecipherable chatter." - NPR

Read this story, and more about Pulitzer celebrations, on our In the News page.

Jurors search for nation’s best journalism

Watch a slide show of the hardworking Nominating Jurors in Journalism. Jurors met on February 22, 23 and 24 to read 1,081 journalism entries online. They worked in both the Pulitzer World Room (pictured right) and the Lecture Hall also located in Pulitzer Hall at Columbia University.

The jurors nominated three finalists in each category. Then The Pulitzer Prize Board made the final decisions. The 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winners and Nominated Finalists were announced on April 15, 2013.




2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Editorial Cartooning

David Horsey, the Los Angeles Times, for his wide ranging cartoons that blend skillful caricature with irreverence, causing readers both to laugh and think.

click here to read cover letter for entry

click on image below to view slideshow

 

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Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist and columnist David Horsey is a political commentator for the Los Angeles Times.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Editorial Writing

Andie Dominick, The Des Moines Register, for her diligent editorials challenging Iowa’s arcane licensing laws that regulate occupations ranging from cosmetologists to dentists and often protect practitioners more than the public.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

March 31, 2013 Irrational licensing laws
April 25, 2013 Liscensing should have room for religious views
May 5, 2013 Claims about La'James need to be investigated
May 14, 2013 Hair braiding shows Iowa's ridiculous laws
May 19, 2013 Dental Board's actions protect dentists, not the public
June 2, 2013 Salon laws and rules need scrutiny
June 14, 2013 Potential for conflicts seen in licensing boards
January 24, 2014 Cover letter for entry

 

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Andie Dominick has been an editorial writer at The Des Moines Register since 2001.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Editorial Writing

Dante Ramos, The Boston Globe, for his evocative editorials urging Boston to become a more modern, around-the-clock city by shedding longtime restrictions and removing bureaucratic obstacles that can sap its vitality.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

February 26, 2013 Hard-charging workforce requires a 24-hour city
February 27, 2013 Austin flexes tech muscles
March 31, 2013 Build future with new people, not old ideas about parking
June 23, 2013 Let developers think small, creating new housing for all
July 1, 2013 To revive city's Main Streets, get more liquor licenses
July 11, 2013 Take note, mayoral hopefuls, as burdens of history recede
December 22, 2013 Boston isn't 'Footloose,' so ease up on dancing rules
December 30, 2013 In time of great promise, a whiff of earlier tensions
Cover letter for entry

 

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Dante Ramos is deputy editorial page editor of The Boston Globe.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Criticism

Jen Graves, The Stranger, a Seattle weekly, for her visual arts criticism that, with elegant and vivid description, informs readers about how to look at the complexities of contemporary art and the world in which it's made.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

February 13, 2013 Charles Krafft is a white nationalist who believes the holocaust is a deliberately exaggerated myth
September 11, 2013 The lies of the artists
December 4, 2013 Shooting and capturing
October 9, 2013 Don’t die
July 10, 2013 The outside artist
May 8, 2013 Dematerialized
March 6, 2013 Chinese treasures shipped out of Tacoma
October 16, 2013 Where race was run
September 4, 2013 Being beaten about the mind and eyes
August 21, 2013 How to succeed in art without even trying
January 24, 2014 Cover letter for entry

 

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Jen Graves has been a newspaper art critic and columnist for 17 years, the last eight at The Stranger in Seattle.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Criticism

Mary McNamara, the Los Angeles Times, for her trenchant and witty television criticism, engaging readers through essays and reviews that feature a conversational style and the force of fresh ideas.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

June 21, 2013 Tough guys' TV talk
November 16, 2013 Tyson weaves, bobs around 'Truth'
May 11, 2013 'Scandal' is must-tweet TV
August 31, 2013 No revolution...yet
September 19, 2013 Now we curl up with a good 'Breaking Bad'
July 19, 2013 Power and glory
July 11, 2013 A fun group to be locked up with
June 27, 2013 Paula Deen burns herself again
April 21, 2013 Modern women for new TV age
March 16, 2013 The naked truth?
Cover letter for entry

 

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Mary McNamara is a television critic and cultural editor for the Los Angeles Times, where she has worked since 1990.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Commentary

Lisa Falkenberg, the Houston Chronicle, for her provocative metro columns written from the perspective of a sixth-generation Texan, often challenging the powerful and giving voice to the voiceless.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

December 6, 2013 System rears ugly head for preteen mother
December 18, 2013 It's time to act, councilman
May 1, 2013 It's just Dad and me on his final haul
July 24, 2013 A tale of 2 victims and 2 different outcomes
March 22, 2013 Principal inspiring her students, but not HISD
July 12, 2013 Reality shows true futility of 'pro-life' stance
June 14, 2013 Anthem's high notes spurred haters' lowest
June 7, 2013 Do expensive glass offices help fight cancer?
June 27, 2013 Tuesday night was not Texas' greatest hour
April 17, 2013 Strength of will, steps of pride keep runners on top
January 24, 2014 Cover letter for entry

 

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Lisa Falkenberg is a metro columnist at the Houston Chronicle.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Commentary

Kevin Cullen, The Boston Globe, for his street-wise local columns that capture the spirit of a city, especially after its famed Marathon was devastated by terrorist bombings.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

March 5, 2013 Clear-eyed in oft-overlooked war
April 20, 2013 Nothing tough about this boxer's character
April 21, 2013 For emergency workers, a moment away
April 23, 2013 Officer always looked out for others
May 10, 2013 A very big difference
May 14, 2013 O'Malley lost me on this
June 25, 2013 Comforting the comforters
August 13, 2013 In the end, everything has passed Whitey by
August 31, 2013 A life of engagement and wondrous words
November 1, 2013 With victory, a lesson in hope
Cover letter for entry

 

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Kevin Cullen is an author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has written for The Boston Globe since 1985.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

International Reporting

Raja Abdulrahim and Patrick McDonnell the Los Angeles Times, for their vivid coverage of the Syrian civil war, showing at grave personal risk how both sides of the conflict contribute to the bloodshed, fear and corruption that define daily life.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

August 21, 2013 In the sniper's sights
March 26, 2013 Syria's Shiites allege ethnic 'terror'
July 24, 2013 Waiting for a son lost in the void
July 30, 2013 Battle in suburbia
September 21, 2013 Assad's other army
April 2, 2013 Syrian rebels resent postware scenario
September 17, 2013 Uneasy life in Damascus' bubble
August 14, 2013 Assad bastion feels targeted
September 12, 2013 At odds in their common cause
October 15, 2013 Weapons deal may help Assad prolong his rule
Cover letter for entry

 

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Raja Abdulrahim is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she has worked for the last five years.

Patrick McDonnell covers the Middle East for the Los Angeles Times, focusing on Syria, Iran and Lebanon.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

International Reporting

Rukmini Callimachi, the Associated Press, for her discovery and fearless exploration of internal documents that shattered myths and deepened understanding of the global terrorist network of al-Qaida.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

December 29, 2013 $0.60 for cake: Al-Qaida records every
expense
May 28, 2013 AP Exclusive: Al-Qaida rips into prima donna terrorist for failing to deliver big operations
February 6, 2013 Woman in Timbuktu punished for forbidden love
February 14, 2013 In Timbuktu, al-Qaida left behind a manifesto
January 22, 2013 Fight for Mali town reflects Islamist tactics
June 11, 2013 Mali manual suggests al-Qaida has feared weapon
February 21, 2013 Al-Qaida tipsheet on avoiding drones found in Mali
July 9, 2013 Yemen terror boss left blueprint for waging jihad
September 29, 2013 Terrorists used new tactic to spare some Muslims
December 9, 2013 AP reporter’s quest to !nd bodies ends in desert
Cover letter for entry

 

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Rukmini Callimachi is the West Africa Bureau Chief for
The Associated Press.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

National Reporting

Jon Hilsenrath , The Wall Street Journal, for his exploration of the Federal Reserve, a powerful but little understood national institution.

 

-all links are to pdfs unless otherwise indicated-

July 29, 2013 Fed 'doves' beat 'hawks' in economic prognosticating
Web entry: Interactive Graphic - Ranking Fed forecasters
May 11-12, 2013 Fed maps exit from stimulus
May 13, 2013 A top contender at the Fed faces test over easy money
June 21, 2013 Markets might be misreading the Fed’s messages
June 22-23, 2013 Fed is toiling in vain to calm jittery markets
September 23, 2013 Yellen would bring tougher tone to Fed
October 8, 2013 Tense negotiations inside the Fed produced muddled signals to markets
October 10, 2013 Yellen gets Fed nomination with bank at turning point
March 18, 2013 Easy-money era a long game for Fed
Cover letter for entry

 

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Jon Hilsenrath is the chief economics correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, where he is responsible for covering the Federal Reserve.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

National Reporting

John Emshwiller and Jeremy Singer-Vine, The Wall Street Journal, for their reports and searchable database on the nation’s often overlooked factories and research centers that once produced nuclear weapons and now pose contamination risks.

 

-all links are to pdfs unless otherwise indicated-

October 30, 2013 A forgotten legacy of nuclear buildup
October 30, 2013 In New York, a tale of exposure raises the question: How much radiation is safe?
Explore sites near you (database)
October 29, 2013 Web entry: Video - Wastelands
November 22, 2013 One town’s atomic legacy: A $500 million cleanup
November 21, 2013 Web entry: Video - Patty Ameno's one-woman nuclear crusade
December 30, 2013 Neighbors fume at radioactive dump
December 30, 2013 Facebook page chronicles accounts of illnesses reported by residents
December 31, 2013 Nuclear waste sits on ocean floor
December 31, 2013 Web entry: Interactive graphic - Waste waters
Cover letter for entry

 

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John Emshwiller is senior special writer for The Wall Street Journal.

Jeremy Singer-Vine is reporter and computer programmer for The Wall Street Journal’s Page One desk, based in New York.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Local Reporting

Rebecca D. O’Brien and Thomas Mashberg of The Record, Woodland Park, N.J., for their jarring exposure of how heroin has permeated the suburbs of northern New Jersey, profiling addicts and anguished families and mapping the drug pipeline from South America to their community.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

May 5, 2013 Suburbia's deadly secret
May 6, 2013 The grim life of suburban addicts
May 7, 2013 'Love cannot stop it'
May 8, 2013 N.J. searching for solutions to rampant heroin problems
May 6, 2013 Nowhere to get clean
December 22, 2013 Heroin's poisonous path to North Jersey
December 23, 2013 Inside suburban drug mills, a grimy lucrative business
December 24, 2013 Help stall in Trenton as frustration grows
December 27, 2013 Online special report: Heroin - suburbia's deadly secret
January 25, 2014 Cover letter for entry

 

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Rebecca D. O'Brien joined the staff of The Record in October 2011.

Thomas Mashberg's freelance work for The Record was supported by a Polk Award grant.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Local Reporting

Joan Garrett McClane, Todd South, Doug Strickland and Mary Helen Miller, Chattanooga Times Free Press, for using an array of journalistic tools to explore the "no-snitch" culture that helps perpetuate a cycle of violence in one of the most dangerous cities in the South.

 

December 15, 2013 Web entry: Speak No Evil
Cover letter for entry (pdf)

 

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Joan Garrett McClane has been a staff writer for the Chattanooga Times Free Press in Tennessee since 2007.

Todd South has been a staff writer for the Chattanooga Times Free Press since 2008.

Doug Strickland is a staff photographer for the Times Free Press and a native of Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Mary Helen Miller is a multimedia journalist who writes articles and produces audio, video and interactive graphics for the Chattanooga Times Free Press.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Explanatory Reporting

Les Zaitz, The Oregonian, Portland, for chilling narratives that, at personal risk to him and his sources, revealed how lethal Mexican drug cartels infiltrated Oregon and other regions of the country.

 

-all links are to pdfs-

June 23, 2013 'They are here'
June 24, 2013 A kingpin's toxic power
June 25, 2013 The dealer next door
June 26, 2013 Cops on the defensive
June 27, 2013 At the end of the supply chain: staggering loss
January 6, 2014 Cover letter for entry

 

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Les Zaitz has been a journalist in Oregon since 1973, joining The Oregonian in 1976.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Nominated Finalist

Explanatory Reporting

Dennis Overbye, The New York Times, for his authoritative illumination of the race by two competing teams of 3,000 scientists and technicians over a seven-year period to discover what physicists call the "God particle."

 

March 5, 2013 Web entry: Chasing the Higgs Boson
Cover letter for entry

 

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Dennis Overbye joined The New York Times in 1998 as the deputy science editor.